Subject: Art / Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions / General

Subject: Art / Collections, Catalogs, Exhibitions / General

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A Panorama of Pittsburgh

|9780822960157|Nineteenth-Century Printed Views|A marvel of modern technology and leader in iron and steel making, coke production, and glass manufacturing, nineteenth-century Pittsburgh acquired a near-mythical status. The city became a symbol of American industrial might and was depicted in everything from fine art to advertising materials. A Panorama of Pittsburgh is a testament to the extensive visual representation of Pittsburgh in books, magazines, illustrated newspapers, frameable views, maps, corporate identity, lithographs, and other types of materials during this period. Produced to accompany an exhibition hosted by the Frick Art & Historical Center as part of Pittsburgh 250, a regional celebration of…

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Steel Shadows

|9780822957485| With Steel Shadows, you don’t have to visit exhibition halls at Carnegie Mellon University or the John Heinz History Center to enjoy Douglas Cooper’s unique, realistic and highly personal images of Pittsburgh. Steel Shadows brings his large charcoal and paper art home to you. Cooper details the inspiration for his artistic vision, as well as the formal properties of his art and how it relates to architecture. The book features double-page spreads of his murals, his essay, and excerpts from Pittsburgh authors telling the stories of the city’s ethnic and eclectic style of neighborhoods, combining details of bridge building…

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Industry in Art

|9780822961543|Pittsburgh, 1812 to 1920|Industry in Art examines the artists, contexts, and societal factors that influenced the depiction of Pittsburgh industry and labor from the early nineteenth century to the early twentieth century through a variety of art forms that include illustration, painting, and graphic art. In the early nineteenth century, most fine artists avoided depicting industry, though David Gilmore Blythe and William C. Wall portrayed the environmental changes caused by industrial growth. By the last quarter of the century, however, national weekly magazines illustrated Pittsburgh’s smoking industrial complexes as symbols of industrial might populated by stoic, working-class heroes working with…

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