Political Science / World / General

Total 6 results found.

Political (In)Justice

Political (In)Justice

Authoritarianism and the Rule of Law in Brazil, Chile, and Argentina

Through a thorough examination of political repression in Brazil, Chile, and Argentina, Anthony Pereira illuminates the ways in which the long-term relationship of a country’s military and judiciary can explain a regime’s overall approach to the law.

The Politics Of Democratization In Korea

The Politics Of Democratization In Korea

The Role of Civil Society

A study that demonstrates how crucial civil society has been to democratic transition, democratic failure, and the recent, ongoing efforts to reform, deepen, and consolidate democracy in Korea.

Policy Making in Israel

Policy Making in Israel

Routines for Simple Problems and Coping with the Complex

Policy Making in Israel analyzes how the Israeli government has coped with an array of problems in its brief history—from war and terrorism attacks, to economic unrest and heavy immigration.

The Development of the Dutch Welfare State

The Development of the Dutch Welfare State

From Workers' Insurance to Universal Entitlement

The Dutch welfare system is one of the most benevolent in the world—but this was not always the case. Cox charts the rapid growth of the Dutch welfare system from the nineteenth century onward, comparing it to other nations, and offering theoretical analysis of this remarkable phenomenon.

Making Common Sense of Japan

Making Common Sense of Japan

Steven Reed takes on the task of demystifying Japanese culture and behavior. Through examples that are familiar to an American audience and his own personal encounters, he argues that the apparent oddity of Japanese behavior flows quite naturally from certain objective conditions that are different from those in the United States. Two aspects of the Japanese economy have particularly baffled Americans: that Japanese workers have “permanent employment” and that the Japanese government cooperates with big business. Reed explains these phenomena in common sense terms. He shows how they developed historically, why they continue, and why they helped produce economic growth. He concludes that these practices are in fact, not very different from the United States.

Conflict and Rhetoric in French Policymaking

Conflict and Rhetoric in French Policymaking

Education policy provides a fertile ground for analyzing the perennial tug-of-war between interest groups and public officials. Baumgartner considers thirty examples of French education policymaking during the early 1980s using a combination of documentary evidence, interviews with more than 100 politicians, civil servants, members of parliament, union and interest group leaders, and a thorough analysis of press coverage of education topics.

Total 6 results found.