Political Science / American Government / National

Total 14 results found.

Corruption and Democracy in Latin America

Corruption and Democracy in Latin America

A groundbreaking national and regional study of corruption and its relation to democracy in Latin America. This book provides policy analysis and prescription through a wide-ranging methodological, empirical, and theoretical survey.

Democratic Brazil Revisited

Democratic Brazil Revisited

Despite the 2002 election of Lula and his Worker’s Party, and their promises of reform—democracy in Brazil remains an enigma. While the country has seen renewed economic growth and progress in areas of health care and education, the gap between rich and poor remains vast. Rampant crime, racial inequality, and a pandemic lack of personal security taint the vision of progress. In this sequel to Democratic Brazil, the contributors assess the impact of competitive politics on Brazilian government, institutions, economics, and society.

Unresolved Tensions

Unresolved Tensions

Bolivia Past and Present

This volume brings together an expert group of commentators and participants from within the Bolivian political arena to offer diverse perspectives on ethnicity, regionalism, state-society relations, constitutional reform, economic development, and globalization.

Democratic Brazil

Democratic Brazil

Actors, Institutions, and Processes

Twelve top scholars analyze Brazilian democracy in a comprehensive, systematic fashion, covering the full period of the New Republic from Presidents Sarney to Cardoso.

By Invitation Only

By Invitation Only

The Rise of Exclusive Politics in the United States

Steven Schier examines the shift in U.S. politics to activation—the political variant of niche marketing. This method encourages only a strategically selected few to get involved, resulting in a decline of majority rule in American politics.

A Two Way Street

A Two Way Street

The Institutional Dynamics of the Modern Administrative State

Relying on advanced statistical techniques and case studies, George Krause argues for a dynamic system of influence. His analysis and conclusions will challenge conventional theoretical and empirical wisdom in the field of administrative politics and public bureaucracy.

Horses In Midstream

Horses In Midstream

U.S. Midterm Elections and Their Consequences, 1894–1998

Horses in Midstream breaks the mold of midterm election literature by focusing on the consequences of midterm elections rather than on the causes of the anti-administration pattern of those elections. The book concludes that the midterm pattern has two primary consequences: it stymies the President and provides an opportunity for the revitalization of the opposition party—and that numerical losses by the President’s party is really only a small part of the equation. Consequently, midterm elections can be considered an additional check in the U.S. political system, acting as a mechanism that helps to assure rough two party balance.

Licensed To Kill?

Licensed To Kill?

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Shoreham Power Plant

Examines the nuclear power plant constructed at Shoreham, New York, and the accumulated miscalculation and mishaps that eventually forced its deconstruction. An intricate study of the groups, policies and regulatory issues involved in a historic legal battle.

The State Roots of National Politics

The State Roots of National Politics

Congress and the Tax Agenda, 1978–1986

Explores the role of state politics in shaping the national agenda during the 1980s. By focusing on the federal tax policy from 1978-1986, Berkman argues that a conservative political agenda slowly replaced the liberal agenda dominant since World War II.

Interests and Institutions

Interests and Institutions

Substance and Structure in American Politics

Interest and Institutions is a collection of essays written by distinguished political scientist Robert Salsibury, a leading analyst of interest group politics. He offers his theories on the workings and influence of groups, organizations, and individuals in many different areas of American politics.

Reluctant Partners

Reluctant Partners

Implementing Federal Policy

Constitutional principles divide authority between market and state and within the structure of the state itself. This diffusion of authority is valuable because it defends against the excesses of national government, causing federal policy initiatives to be more attuned to local jurisdictions, and creating a context in which free enterprise may flourish. However, this diffusion of authority weakens the control that federal officials enjoy over resources vital to the implementation of national policy. Reluctant Partners explores these problems and proposes strategies to reduce the impediments to cooperation and promote policy coordination. Drawing upon theories of regime development and cooperation, Stoker suggests the “implementation regime framework” to analyze the difficulties of realizing cooperation in the implementation process.

Making Regulatory Policy

Making Regulatory Policy

Few scholars have applied modern behavioral and organization theory to study U.S. regulatory agencies, and fewer still have integrated this approach with frameworks drawn from administrative law and analysis. This multidisciplinary collection combines detailed case studies with theoretical discussions drawing upon legal concepts, organizational analysis, and behavioral theory.

The Politics of Public Utility Regulation

The Politics of Public Utility Regulation

This book focuses on the important and increasingly controversial issues of utility regulation by combining a sophisticated understanding of these issues with a rigorous examination of various regulatory arrangements in the United States. Gormley makes specific proposals for regulatory reform and emphasizes the importance (and difficulty) of assuring both expertise and accountability.

Herbert Hoover and Economic Diplomacy

Herbert Hoover and Economic Diplomacy

Department of Commerce Policy, 1921-1928

From 1921 to 1928, future president Hoover built the Commerce Department into one of the most influential forces in federal government. During this time, the United States became a major creditor to other nations, which in turn had a significant impact on power relations between nations. The Commerce Department also became a champion of American economic rights and independence from foreign commodities, and in the process became the guiding force in national economic policy.

Total 14 results found.