Business & Economics / Labor

Total 12 results found.

The Glass House Boys of Pittsburgh

The Glass House Boys of Pittsburgh

Law, Technology, and Child Labor

An original examination of legislative clashes over the singular issue of the glass house boys, who performed menial tasks, received low wages, and had little to say on their own behalf while toiling in glass bottle plants. Flannery reveals the many societal, economic, and political factors at work that allowed for the perpetuation of child labor in this industry and region.

Harry, Tom, and Father Rice

Harry, Tom, and Father Rice

Accusation and Betrayal in America's Cold War

Centered around mostly ordinary people, Harry, Tom, and Father Rice relates the story of the author’s uncle Harry Davenport, union leader Tom Quinn, and Father Charles Owen Rice to the great conflict between anti-Communist and Communist forces in the American labor movement.

Organized Labor In Postcommunist States

Organized Labor In Postcommunist States

From Solidarity To Infirmity

Examination of why the power and role of workers’ unions have greatly diminished in the former Soviet Union and Eastern European countries since the fall of Communism. Generally surprising turn of events, since organized labor played a large role in regime change.

Parties And Unions In The New Global Economy

Parties And Unions In The New Global Economy

A comparative examination of how union leaders in Spain, Mexico, and Venezuela respond when the political parties traditionally allied with labor enact laws harmful to workers.

The Steel Workers

The Steel Workers

The Steel Workers remains a readable and timeless account of labor conditions in the early years of the steel industry. An introduction by the noted historian Roy Lubove places the book in political and historical context.

The River Ran Red

The River Ran Red

“The River Ran Red” commemorates the one-hundredth anniversary of the Homestead strike of 1892. The book recreates the events of that summer in excerpts from contemporary newspapers and magazines, reproductions of pen-and-ink sketches and photographs made on the scene, passages from the congressional investigation that resulted from the strike, first-hand accounts by observers and participants, and poems, songs, and sermons from across the country. Contributions by outstanding scholars provide the context for understanding the social and cultural aspects of the strike, as well as its violence.

Thunder In the Mountains

Thunder In the Mountains

The West Virginia Mine War, 1920–21

Much neglected in historical accounts, Thunder in the Mountains is the only available book-length account of the crisis in American industrial relations and governance that occured during the West Virginia mine war of 1920-21.

What’s a Coal Miner to Do?

What’s a Coal Miner to Do?

The Mechanization of Coal Mining

This book explores the impact of technology on coal miners and operators. Dix reconstructs the history of the “hand-loading” era, then views the evolution of mechanical coal technology, the rise of the United Mine Workers, and the expanded role of the state under New Deal legislation.

And the Wolf Finally Came

And the Wolf Finally Came

The Decline and Fall of the American Steel Industry

A veteran reporter on American labor, John P. Hoerr analyzes the spectacular and tragic collapse of the steel industry in the 1980s. And the Wolf Finally Came demonstrates how an obsolete and adversarial relationship between management and labor made it impossible for the industry to adapt to a rapidly changing global economy.

Steelmasters and Labor Reform, 1886-1923

Steelmasters and Labor Reform, 1886-1923

Gerald G. Eggert provides a fascinating inside view of top steel officials arguing their positions on various labor reforms—stock purchase plans, employer liability, employee representation, and elimination of the twelve-hour shift and seven-day work week, during the late eighteen and early nineteenth century.

The Homestead Strike of 1892

The Homestead Strike of 1892

In 1893 Arthur Burgoyne, one of Pittsburgh’s most skilled and sensitive journalists, published Homestead, a complete history of the 1892 Homestead strike and the ensuing conflict between the Carnegie Steel Company and the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers. Accurate, readable, and judiciously balanced in assigning blame, this work gives crucial insight into a turbulent period in Pittsburgh’s history.

The Emergence of a UAW Local, 1936–1939

The Emergence of a UAW Local, 1936–1939

A Study in Class and Culture

This book is a firsthand account of the experience of unionization in personal and social terms. Freidlander describes the transformation of a working-class community by its own actions and the ensuing stratification within that union.

Total 12 results found.