Political Science / Political Process / Elections

Total 6 results found.

Electing Chavez

Electing Chavez

The Business of Anti-neoliberal Politics in Venezuela

Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez was the first anti-neoliberal presidential candidate to win in the region. Electing Chavez examines the circumstances that facilitated this pivotal election. Gates examines how Chavez won over voters and even obtained the secret allegiance of a group of business “elite outliers,” with a reinterpretation of the relationship between business and the state during Venezuela’s era of two-party dominance.

Unexpected Outcomes

Unexpected Outcomes

Electoral Systems, Political Parties, and Representation in Russia

Robert Moser offers a sophisticated analysis of Russia’s complex electoral system, and its effects on political parties and representation in Russia during the 1990s.

To Vote or Not to Vote

To Vote or Not to Vote

The Merits and Limits of Rational Choice Theory

Blais tackles the controversial topic of rational choice theory in an engaging and personal way, bringing together the opposing theories and literatures, and offering convincing tests of these different viewpoints in order to find out what makes people decide to vote.

Urban Poverty, Political Participation, and the State

Urban Poverty, Political Participation, and the State

Lima, 1970–1990

Offers an unparalleled longitudinal view of how the urban poor of Lima viewed themselves and organized to acquire basic goods and services. Grounding research on theoretical notions from Albert Hirschman and an analytical framework from Verba and Nie, Dietz produces findings that hold great interest for comparativists and students of political behavior in general.

National Elections and the Autonomy of American State Party Systems

National Elections and the Autonomy of American State Party Systems

Traditional theories of party organization have emphasized two-party electoral competition as the force behind party unity in state politics. V. O. Key first advanced this theory in Southern Politics, where he concluded that party factionalism in the South was mainly attributable to the one-party character of the region. But this traditional theory does not fit all states equally well. In the states of the West, especially, parties are competitive, but political activity is centered on candidates, not parties. The theory of candidate-centered politics allows Gimpel to explain why party factionalism has persisted in many regions of the United States in spite of fierce two-party competition. Using interviews, polling data, elections returns, and demographic information, Gimpel contends that major upheavals in the two-party balance of presidential voting may leave lower offices untouched.

The Brazilian Voter

The Brazilian Voter

Mass Politics in Democratic Transition, 1974–1986

This book views how the dramatic transition from military to civilian rule in Brazil between 1974 and 1985 raises critical questions about voters, competitive party politics, and democracy at the end of the twentieth century.

Total 6 results found.