History / Europe / General

Total 10 results found.

Rivers Lost, Rivers Regained

Rivers Lost, Rivers Regained

Rethinking City-River Relations

Rivers Lost, Rivers Regained discusses how cities have gained control and exerted power over rivers and waterways far upstream and downstream; how rivers and floodplains in cityscapes have been transformed by urbanization and industrialization; how urban rivers have been represented in cultural manifestations, such as novels and songs; and discusses more recent strategies to redefine and recreate the place of the river within the urban setting.

Tangible Belonging

Tangible Belonging

Negotiating Germanness in Twentieth-Century Hungary

A compelling historical and ethnographic study of the German speakers in Hungary, from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century. John C. Swanson’s work looks deeply into the enduring sense of tangible belonging that characterized Germanness from the perspective of rural dwellers, as well as the broader phenomenon of “minority making” in twentieth-century Europe.

The Imagined Empire

The Imagined Empire

Balloon Enlightenments in Revolutionary Europe

The hot-air balloon, invented by the Montgolfier brothers in 1783, launched for the second time just days before the Treaty of Paris would end the American Revolutionary War. The technological marvel highlighted celebrations of French military victory against Britain and ignited a balloon mania that swept across Europe at the end of the Enlightenment. This frenzy for balloon experiments fundamentally altered the once elite audience for science by bringing aristocrats and commoners together. This book explores how this flying machine not only expanded the audience for science but also inspired utopian dreams of a republican monarchy that would obliterate social boundaries. The balloon was a people-machine that unified and mobilized the people of France, who imagined an aerial empire that would bring glory to the French nation.

Urban Rivers

Urban Rivers

Remaking Rivers, Cities, and Space in Europe and North America

Urban Rivers examines urban interventions on rivers through politics, economics, sanitation systems, technology, and societies; how rivers affected urbanization spatially, in infrastructure, territorial disputes, and in flood plains, and via their changing ecologies. Providing case studies from Vienna to Manitoba, the chapters assemble geographers and historians in a comparative survey of how cities and rivers interact from the seventeenth century to the present.

Nature in the New World

Nature in the New World

From Christopher Columbus to Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Gerbi examines the fascinating reports of the first Europeans to see the Americas. These accounts provided the basis for the images of strange and new flora, fauna, and human creatures that filled European imaginations. Chapters include the writings of Columbus, Vespucci, Cortes, Verrazzano, and Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo. Gerbi contends that Oviedo was a major, though overlooked, authority on the culture, history, and conquest of the New World.

The Dispute of the New World

The Dispute of the New World

The History of a Polemic, 1750–1900

When Hegel described the Americas as an inferior continent, he was repeating a contention that inspired one of the most passionate debates of modern times. This thesis drew heated responses from politicians, philosophers, publicists, and patriots on both sides of the Atlantic. The ensuing polemic reached its apex in the late eighteenth century and is far from extinct today. The Dispute of the New World is the definitive study of this debate.

Rivers in History

Rivers in History

Perspectives on Waterways in Europe and North America

This book presents one of the first comparative histories of rivers on the continents of Europe and North America in the modern age. The contributors examine the impact of rivers on humans and, conversely, the impact of humans on rivers. They view this dynamic relationship through political, cultural, industrial, social, and ecological perspectives in national and transnational settings. Contributors analyze the regional, national, and international politicization of rivers, the use and treatment of waterways in urban versus rural environments, and the increasing role of international commissions in ecological and commercial legislation for the protection of river resources. Case studies include the Seine in Paris, the Mississippi, the Volga, the Rhine, and the rivers of Pittsburgh.

Weimar Prussia, 1925–1933

Weimar Prussia, 1925–1933

The Illusion of Strength

With the development of a strong parliamentary system, Orlow shows how close Prussia came to realizing its goal of lasting democracy for the entire Reich, and how far it fell when the Nazis took power.

Jan Waclaw Machajski

Jan Waclaw Machajski

A Radical Critic of the Russian Intelligentsia and Socialism

Jan Waclaw Machajski’s (1866-1926) political doctrine, known as Makhaevism, was a synthesis of several revolutionary theories in Western and Eastern Europe: Marxism, anarchism, and syndicalism. His criticism of the intelligentsia and theory of a “new class” were influential to Communism and helped to create a hostility that culminated in Stalin’s Great Purge of the 1930s.

Dilemmas of Democracy

Dilemmas of Democracy

Tocqueville and Modernization

A thorough analysis of Tocqueville’s thoughts on the lower classes of society, viewing his stances on slavery, poverty, criminality, and working class conditions, and their role in the transition to a modern, democratic, and industrial society.

Total 10 results found.