SALT

Implications for Arms Control in the 1970s

A fascinating book, unusually consistent and of high quality; the separate contributions and the summaries of the discussions bear many marks of careful and thorough preparation; a business-like minimum of jargon and a bearable level of wishful model-making enhance its appeal. . . . The last section is a summary of what the 1972 agreements comprise, with a brief but very perceptive analysis. . . . Though it is principally concerned with SALT, [the book] is careful to avoid only super-power preoccupations and perspectives.
International Affairs

A collection of original essays dealing with many aspects of the complex problems of arms control, this volume provides an understanding of the political, strategic, technological, and bureaucratic constraints affecting the development of arms control policies by major powers. Among the diverse subjects examined are American and Soviet interests in arms control, and the rationale for arms control in alternative international systems based upon either bipolarity or multipolarity. The volume also includes a discussion of the critical technological factors which have important implications for the Strategic Arms Limitations Talks (SALT), an examination of structural change in the international system, the emergence of additional centers of power, and the implications of SALT for would-be nuclear powers.Contributors: Robert R. Bowie, J. I. Coffey, James E. Dougherty, Wynfred Joshua, Geoffrey Kemp, Takeshi Muramatsu, George H. Quester, Robert A. Scalapino, Ian Smart, William R. Van Cleave, Thomas W. Wolfe, and the editors.

472 Pages, 6 x 9 in.

January, 1973

isbn : 9780822984412

about the editors

William R. Kintner

William R. Kintner is director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute, Philadelphia, and professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania.

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William R. Kintner
Robert L. Pfaltzgraff Jr.

Robert L. Pfaltzgraff, Jr. is deputy director of the Foreign Policy Research Institute, Philadelphia, and associate professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

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Robert L. Pfaltzgraff Jr.