Admit One: An American Scrapbook

An unflinching look at the underpinnings of racism in the U.S., via key figures who used science to defend sterilization, exploitation, discrimination, segregation, and dehumanization of nonwhites, whites not deemed white enough, and anyone 'less' than those with 'superior' genes. With the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair as a framework, Collins attempts to understand her family's experience of and participation in those times. Her poems are lists, definitions, newspaper pages, historical time lines, and biographical facts. These diverse poetic forms highlight the beauty of diversity itself. But Collins never lets up on the driving themes of unethical treatment and collective culpability. In fact, 'Postscript Three' punctuates this powerful collection with the vitriol still spewed and sensationalized, keeping racism depressingly alive in a supposedly advanced century.
Booklist

Praise for Martha Collins:
“A dazzling poet whose poetry is poised at the juncture between the lyric and ethics, Martha Collins has addressed some of the most traumatic social issues of the twentieth century . . . in supple and complex poems. . . .[N]o subject is off limits for her piercing intellect.”
—Cynthia Hogue, AWP Chronicle

104 Pages, 6 x 9 in.

March, 2016

isbn : 9780822964056

about the author

Martha Collins

Martha Collins is the author of seven previous books of poetry, including Day Unto Day, White Papers, and Blue Front, and co-translator of four collections of Vietnamese poetry. Founder of the creative writing program at the University of Massachusetts-Boston, she served for ten years as Pauline Delaney Professor of Creative Writing at Oberlin College.

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Martha Collins