Science At Centurys End

Philosophical Questions On The Progress And Limits Of S

The exemplars from 18th-century chemistry, 19th-century electromagnetic theory, and contemporary particle physics, biology, and quantum theory well illustrate the classical struggles of realism, induction, explanation, and prediction that occupy current considerations of modern scientific change. . . . This volume well represents a fertile spectrum of issues of urgency to both introductory and veteran participants. Highly recommended.
Choice

To most laypersons and scientists, science and progress appear to go hand in hand, yet philosophers and historians of science have long questioned the inevitability of this pairing. As we take leave of a century acclaimed for scientific advances and progress, Science at Century’s End, the eighth volume of the Pittsburgh-Konstanz Series in the Philosophy and History of Science, takes the reader to the heart of this important matter. Subtitled Philosophical Questions on the Progress and Limits of Science, this timely volume contains twenty penetrating essays by prominent philosophers and historians who explore and debate the limits of scientific inquiry and their presumed consequences for science in the 21st century.

400 Pages, 6 x 9 in.

March, 2004

isbn : 9780822958208

about the editors

Martin Carrier

Martin Carrier is professor of philosophy at Bielefeld University in Germany.

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Martin Carrier
Laura Ruetsche

Laura Ruetsche joined the Philosophy Department of the University of Pittsburgh in 1996, and has been an associate director of Pittsburgh’s Center for Philosophy of Science since 1997. Her primary research interest is the philosophy of physics, particularly the interpretation of quantum theories.

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Laura Ruetsche
Gerald J. Massey

Gerald J. Massey is Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh. From 1988 to 1997 he was director of the University of Pittsburgh’s renowned Center for Philosophy of Science. For the past several years he has been investigating the philosophical implications of the sciences of animals in an effort to create a new field that he calls philosophical ethology. In 1997, German President Roman Herzog conferred on him the Officer’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany (Bundesverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse) for his contributions to German-American Philosophy.

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Gerald J. Massey