Legacy Cities

Continuity and Change amid Decline and Revival

The major contributions of Legacy Cities are that it illustrates change is in the wind, which is being powered by organized citizen action at the neighborhood level, that despite the inability of city governments to take extensive transformative efforts, the citizens are marshalling resources forces for positive change, and that, as with Ezekiel, there is still life in these old bones.
John Mullin, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Legacy cities, also commonly referred to as shrinking, or post-industrial cities, are places that have experienced sustained population loss and economic contraction. In the United States, legacy cities are those that are largely within the Rust Belt that thrived during the first half of the 20th century. In the second half of the century, these cities declined in economic power and population leaving a legacy of housing stock, warehouse districts, and infrastructure that is ripe for revitalization. This volume explores not only the commonalities across legacy cities in terms of industrial heritage and population decline, but also their differences. Legacy Cities poses the questions: What are the legacies of legacy cities? How do these legacies drive contemporary urban policy, planning and decision-making? And, what are the prospects for the future of these cities? Contributors primarily focus on Cleveland, Ohio, but all Rust Belt cities are discussed.

240 Pages, 6 x 9 in.

June, 2019

isbn : 9780822945635

about the editors

J. Rosie Tighe

J. Rosie Tighe is an associate professor in the department of Urban Studies at Cleveland State University’s Levin College of Urban Affairs.

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J. Rosie Tighe
Stephanie Ryberg-Webster

Stephanie Ryberg-Webster is an associate professor in the department of Urban Studies at Cleveland State University’s Levin College of Urban Affairs, where she also directs the Master of Urban Planning and Development program.

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Stephanie Ryberg-Webster