Books

Total 1476 results found.

Solid State Insurrection

Solid State Insurrection

How the Science of Substance Made American Physics Matter

A new perspective to some of the most enduring questions about the role of physics in American history.

Blues Walked In, The

Blues Walked In, The

A Novel

A Fascinating Historical Novel, featuring Lena Horne, and a Vividly Imagined Portrait of Pittsburgh’s Vibrant Hill District in the 1930’s

The Dogs of Detroit

The Dogs of Detroit

Stories

Winner of the 2018 Drue Heinz Literature Prize, Now in Paperback

The Age of Scientific Naturalism

The Age of Scientific Naturalism

Tyndall and His Contemporaries

Physicist John Tyndall and his contemporaries were at the forefront of developing the cosmology of scientific naturalism during the Victorian period. They rejected all but physical laws as having any impact on the operations of human life and the universe. Contributors focus on the way Tyndall and his correspondents developed their ideas through letters, periodicals and scientific journals and challenge previously held assumptions about who gained authority, and how they attained and defended their position within the scientific community.

The Holocaust in the East

The Holocaust in the East

Local Perpetrators and Soviet Responses

This book explores little-known dimensions of the Holocaust on Soviet territory: how the Soviet state and citizens reacted to the annihilation of the Jewish population and how to understand the role of local participants.

Sound of the Ax

Sound of the Ax

Aphorisms and Poems by William Stafford

Sound of the Ax is a collection of over 400 wise and witty sayings and 26 aphoristic poems by one of the essential poets of the twentieth century, William Stafford.

Renovating Rhetoric in Christian Tradition

Renovating Rhetoric in Christian Tradition

Throughout history, people have appropriated and reconstructed rhetorical and religious resources to create effective arguments. In the process, they have remade both themselves and their communities. This volume offers notable examples of these reconstructions, ranging from arguments that occurred during the formation of Christianity to contemporary arguments about the relationship of religious and academic ways of knowing.

Democracy Assistance from the Third Wave

Democracy Assistance from the Third Wave

Polish Engagement in Belarus and Ukraine

The role of Western NGOs in the transition of postcommunist nations to democracy has been well documented. In this study, Paulina Pospieszna follows a different trajectory, examining the role of a former aid recipient (Poland), newly democratic itself, and its efforts to aid democratic transitions in the neighboring states of Belarus and Ukraine.

Architecture, Politics, and Identity in Divided Berlin

Architecture, Politics, and Identity in Divided Berlin

Emily Pugh provides an original comparative analysis of selected works of architecture and urban planning in East and West Berlin during the “Wall era,” to reveal the importance of these structures to the formation of political, cultural, and social identities.

Toxic Airs

Toxic Airs

Body, Place, Planet in Historical Perspective

Toxic Airs brings together historians of medicine, environmental historians, historians of science and technology, and interdisciplinary scholars to address atmospheric issues at a spectrum of scales from body to place to planet. The chapters analyze airborne and atmospheric threats posed to humans. The contributors demonstrate how conceptions of toxicity have evolved over many centuries and how humans have both created and mitigated toxins in the air.

Producing Good Citizens

Producing Good Citizens

Literacy Training in Anxious Times

Recent global security threats, economic instability, and political uncertainty have placed great scrutiny on the requirements for U.S. citizenship. The stipulation of literacy has long been one of these criteria. In Producing Good Citizens, Amy J. Wan examines the historic roots of this phenomenon, looking specifically to the period just before World War I, up until the Great Depression. During this time, the United States witnessed a similar anxiety over the influx of immigrants, economic uncertainty, and global political tensions.Citing numerous literacy theorists, Wan analyzes the correlation of reading and writing skills to larger currents within American society. She shows how early literacy training coincided with the demand for laborers during the rise of mass manufacturing, while also providing an avenue to economic opportunity for immigrants.

Kindle eBook Available

iPad eBook

Nook eBook Available

Energy Capitals

Energy Capitals

Local Impact, Global Influence

Fossil fuels propelled industries and nations into the modern age and continue to powerfully influence economies and politics today. As Energy Capitals demonstrates, the discovery and exploitation of fossil fuels has proven to be a mixed blessing in many of the cities and regions where it has occurred. With case studies from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Norway, Africa, and Australia, this volume views a range of older and more recent energy capitals, contrasts their evolutions, and explores why some capitals were able to influence global trends in energy production and distribution while others failed to control even their own destinies.

Rhetoric in American Anthropology

Rhetoric in American Anthropology

Gender, Genre, and Science

Winner, 2016 CCCC Outstanding Book Award

In the early twentieth century, the field of anthropology transformed itself from the “welcoming science,” uniquely open to women, people of color, and amateurs, into a professional science of culture. The new field grew in rigor and prestige but excluded practitioners and methods that no longer fit a narrow standard of scientific legitimacy. In Rhetoric in American Anthropology, Risa Applegarth traces the “rhetorical archeology” of this transformation in the writings of early women anthropologists.

Astronomy in India, 1784-1876

Astronomy in India, 1784-1876

Indian scientific achievements in the early twentieth century are well known, with a number of heralded individuals making globally recognized strides in the field of astrophysics. Covering the period from the foundation of the Asiatick Society in 1784 to the establishment of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science in 1876, Sen explores the relationship between Indian astronomers and the colonial British. He shows that from the mid-nineteenth century, Indians were not passive receivers of European knowledge, but active participants in modern scientific observational astronomy.

Total 1476 results found.