Louis A. Pérez Jr.

Louis A. Pérez Jr.

Louis A. Perez Jr. is J. Carlyle Sitterson Professor of History at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Cuban Studies 38

Cuban Studies has been published annually by the University of Pittsburgh Press since 1985. Founded in 1970, it is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in both English and Spanish, a large book review section, and an exhaustive compilation of recent works in the field.

Widely praised for its interdisciplinary approach and trenchant analysis of an array of topics, each volume features the best scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. Cuban Studies 38 includes essays on the politics of liberation, including: the competing strands of liberalism emanating from Havana in the early nineteenth century; Jose Martí’s theory of psychocoloniality; and the relationship between sugar planters, insurgents, and the Spanish military during the revolution. This volume also reflects on cultural themes, such as the new aesthetics of the everyday in Cuban cinema, the “recovery” of poet José Angel Buesa, and the meaning of Elián Gonzales in the context of life in Miami.

Cuban Studies 25

Cuban Studies XXV has a historical focus, emphasizing labor history, race relations, and the role of women. Of special interest is an overview by Jorge I. Dominguez, one of the journal’s four rotating editors, of the contents and evolving mission of Cuban Studies.

Cuban Studies 21

Volume 21, edited by Louis A. Perez, Jr., highlights Cuban history from the late colonial period to the twentieth century, featuring Cuba’s relations with the United States, uprisings among Afro-Cubans, and the emigre experience. The Debate section continues the controversy over the Rectification process in Cuba.

Cuban Studies 37

Cuban Studies has been published annually by the University of Pittsburgh Press since 1985. Founded in 1970, it is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in both English and Spanish, a large book review section, and an exhaustive compilation of recent works in the field.

Widely praised for its interdisciplinary approach and trenchant analysis of an array of topics, each volume features the best scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. Cuban Studies 37 includes articles on environmental law, economics, African influence in music, irreverent humor in postrevolutionary fiction, international education flow between the United States and Cuba, and poetry, among others.

Cuban Studies 36

Cuban Studies has been published annually by the University of Pittsburgh Press since 1985. Founded in 1970, it is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in both English and Spanish, a large book review section, and an exhaustive compilation of recent works in the field.

Widely praised for its interdisciplinary approach, and trenchant analysis of an array of topics, each volume features the best scholarship in the humanities and social sciences. Cuban Studies 36 includes articles on economics, politics, racial and gender issues, and the exodus of Cuban Jewry in the early 1960s, among others. Contributing authors are: Kenya C. Dworkin y Méndez, Beatriz Calvo Peña, Mary Speck, Luz Mena, Gema R. Guevara and Dana Evan Kaplan.

Cuban Studies 40

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish, a large book review section, and an exhaustive compilation of recent works in the field.

Cuban Studies 40 features a broad spectrum of articles, including essays on: the role of race in the revolution of 1933; the subject of disaster in eighteenth-century Cuban poetry; developments in Cuban historiography over the past fifty years; a profile of the work of historian Jose Vega Sunol; and a remembrance of essayist and literary critic Nara Araujo, who also contributed an article on travel in Cuba for this volume.

Beginning with Cuban Studies 34 (2003), the publication is available electronically through Project MUSE¨. More information can be found at http://muse.jhu.edu/publishers/pitt_press/.

Cuban Studies 39

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish, a large book review section, and an exhaustive compilation of recent works in the field.Cuban Studies 39 includes essays on: the recent transformation of the Cuban film animation industry and its continuing cultural impact; the influence of the liberal agenda of Justo Rufino Barrios on Jose Marti; a profile of the music of the Special Period and its social commentary; an in-depth examination of the contents, important themes, and enormous research potential of the Miscelanea de Expedientes collection at the Cuban National Archive; and a realistic assessment on the political future of Cuba. Beginning with volume 34 (2003), the publication is available electronically through Project MUSE¨. More information can be found at http://muse.jhu.edu/publishers/pitt_press/.

The Archives Of Cuba/Los Archivos De Cuba

The Archives of Cuba/Los archivos de Cuba is the first comprehensive guide to the archival holdings and manuscript collections located throughout the fourteen provinces of Cuba, and each is identified with its local address. The collections hold a vast assortment of research materials from the sixteenth through the twentieth centuries. Records encompass family papers, government documents, parish collections, notary records, corporate papers, archives of private associations, personal collections, and much more. Sites listed include the Archivo Nacional, the Biblioteca Nacional Jose Marti, provincial archives, municipal archives and museums, parish archives, cemetery archives, and many others. The volume also provides a general descriptive inventory of each archival holding and manuscript collection. It is an indispensable reference tool for anyone conducting research on Cuban history or culture.

Cuba Between Empires 1878-1902

Cuban independence arrived formally on May 20, 1902, with the raising of the Cuban flag in Havana – a properly orchestrated and orderly inauguration of the new republic. But something had gone awry. Republican reality fell far short of the separatist ideal. In an unusually powerful book that will appeal to the general reader as well as to the specialist, Louis A. Perez, Jr., recounts the story of the critical years when Cuba won its independence from Spain only to fall in the American orbit.
The last quarter of the nineteenth century found Cuba enmeshed in a complicated colonial environment, tied to the declining Spanish empire yet economically dependent on the newly ascendant United States. Rebellion against Spain had involved two generations of Cubans in major but fruitless wars. By careful examination of the social and economic changes occurring in Cuba, and of the political content of the separatist movement, the author argues that the successful insurrection of 1895-98 was not simply the last of the New World rebellions against European colonialism. It was the first of a genre that would become increasingly familiar in the twentieth century: a guerrilla war of national liberation aspiring to the transformation of society.
The third player in the drama was the United States. For almost a century, the United States had pursuedthe acquistion of Cuba. Stepping in when Spain was defeated, the Americans occupied Cuba ostensibly to prepare it for independence but instead deliberately created institutions that restored the social hierarchy and guaranteed political and economic dependence. It was not the last time the U.S. intervention would thwart the Cuban revolutionary impulse.

Cuba under the Platt Amendment, 1902–1934

• Choice 1987 Outstanding Academic Book

This book examines the early years of the Cuban Republic, launched in 1902 after the war with Spain. Although no longer a colony, the country was still hobbled by continuing dependence on and exploitation from a foreign power. Pérez shows how U.S. armed intervention in Cuba in 1898 and subsequent military occupation revitalized elements of the colonial system that would serve imperialist interests during independence. The concessions of the Platt Amendment in 1903 became the principal instrument for U.S. expansion in Cuba. The U.S. then gained control over resources and markets.

Lords of the Mountain

Social Banditry and Peasant Protest in Cuba, 1878-1918

Lords of the Mountain is a colorful narrative that views how Cuba's violent history in the late nineteenth and early twentieth-century was also a history of economic violence. From the 1870s, the expanding sugar industry began to swallow up rural communities and destroy the traditional land tenure system, as the great sugar estates-the “latifundia” dominated the economy. Perez chronicles the popular resistance to these powerful landholders, and the violent uprisings and banditry propagated against them.

Intervention, Revolution, and Politics in Cuba, 1913-1921

Perez views the various economic, political and diplomatic methods used by the United States government to exert hegemony over Cuba from 1913-1921. He also examines the political turmoil and collapse of the traditional Cuban party structure, as candidates were forced to forge alliances with the U.S.

Army Politics in Cuba, 1898-1958

Louis A. Pérez examines the founding of the national army in Cuba, the rise and fall of Cuban army preeminence during the Machado regime, the bizarre army seizure of power in 1933, which resulted in the collapse of the officer corps, and follows the dominance of the army until the revolution of 1958. He shows that the Cuban political order rested on the stability of the army, which itself grew increasingly estranged from national traditions and eventually became the tool of a clique of political leaders, only to fall to rebel forces during the revolution.