Cole Blasier

Cole Blasier

Cole Blasier, Professor of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh, is author of The Giant’s Rival: The USSR and Latin America. Blasier studied or taught at Universities in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico and served as a career foreign service officer in Belgrade, Bonn, Moscow, and Washington. Because of long first-hand experience in official Washington and Moscow and extensive residence in Latin America, Blasier is uniquely qualified to appraise this complex arena of conflict.

The Giant’s Rival

The USSR and Latin America, Revised Edition

The Giant's Rival is an authoritative survey of Soviet relations with Latin America. Blasier provides a concise account of Soviet diplomatic, economic, and political-military involvement in the region, focusing on the post-1970 period.

This revised edition includes chapters analyzing developments since 1983. Blasier views the origins of the Sandinista revolution, and its relation to international Communism, and how the Nicaraguan government has grown dependent on Soviet oil, arms, and economic and political assistance. He also describes the growing relations between the New Jewel Movement in Grenada and Moscow before it was toppled by the U.S. invasion. Blasier explains how U.S. policies have affected Soviet outcomes and makes proposals for protecting and advancing U.S. interests.

The Hovering Giant (Revised Edition)

U.S. Responses to Revolutionary Change in Latin America, 1910–1985

In the first edition of The Hovering Giant, Cole Blasier analyzed U.S. response to revolutions in Latin America from Madero in Mexico to Allende in Chile. He explained why U.S. leaders sponsored paramilitary units to overthrow revolutionary governments in Guatemala and Cuba and compromised their own differences with revolutionary governments in Mexico and Bolivia. The protection of private U.S. interests was part of the explanation, but Blasier gave greater emphasis to rivalry with Germany or the Soviet Union.
Now in this revised edition, Blasier also examines the responses of the Carter and Reagan administrations to the Grenadian and Nicaraguan revolutions and the revolt in El Salvador. He also brings up to date the interpretation of U.S.-Cuban relations.
Blasier stresses U.S. defense of its preeminent position in the Caribean Basin, as well as rivalry with the Soviet Union, to explain these later U.S. responses. Seemingly unaware of historical experience, Washington followed patterns in Central America and Grenada similar to earlier patterns in Guatemala, Cuba, and Chile even though the latter had adverse effects on U.S. security and economic interests.

Cuba in the World

Since the 1970s, Cuba has greatly expanded its participation in world affairs. What changes in its leadership, economy, and armed forces explain this increased participation? How do Cuban ties with Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Africa, Israel, and the socialist countries reveal Cuban purposes and affect U.S.-Cuban rapprochement? Cuba in the World addresses these and other important questions in the most comprehensive and authoritative review of Cuban foreign policies since the Revolution.

Constructive Change in Latin America

Edited By Cole Blasier

Cole Blasier draws together eight essays from economists, political scientists, anthropologists, and other social scientists to discuss the growth of Latin American economics during the late twentieth-century. Anthropologist John P. Gillin looks at the impact of industrialization on a Guatemalan village, and sociologists Fernando Cardoso and José Luis Reyna present a pioneering analysis of the effect of industrialization on occupational structure and social stratification. Dwight Brothers takes a critical look at the role of private investment, and fellow economist John Powelson proposes that an integrated social science model of economic growth could resolve some of the conflict between North American economic principles and Latin American political interests. Richard S. Thorn, formerly with the IMF, analyzes the achievements and short-comings of the Alliance for Progress. Literary critic Germán Arciniegas probes the traditional interaction between Latin American intellectuals and politics, and political scientist James Malloy describes the revolutionary movement in Bolivia and its inability to reconcile the competing demands of political control and economic development.