Alejandro de la Fuente

Alejandro de la Fuente is the Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics and professor of African and African American studies at Harvard University and director of the Afro-Latin American Research Institute in the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. He is the author of Havana and the Atlantic in the Sixteenth Century and A Nation for All: Race, Inequality, and Politics in Twentieth-Century Cuba, and is the editor of Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art.

Cuban Studies 48

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section.

Cuban Studies 47

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section.
Cuban Studies 47 includes a dossier on cultural politics and political cultures of the Cuban Revolution.

Cuban Studies 46

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section.

Cuban Studies 46 includes a critical dossier on poet Lourdes Casal, with individual essays viewing issues of race, feminism, and diaspora in her work. Additional essays address voices of economic change from the nonstate sector; cinema and church during the Special Period; and race, identity, and Cuban women’s activism in historic and cultural contexts.

Cuban Studies 45

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section.

Cuban Studies 45 features two special dossiers: the first discusses the history and workings of the Cuban constitution and the need to revisit it along with civil and political rights; the second offers new perspectives on the history of health, medicine, and disease in Cuba, and views race as a factor in both infant mortality and tuberculosis from the early-to-mid twentieth century.

Additional essays discuss culture through poetry, higher education reform, the narratives of Lordes Casal, and filmmaker Jesus Diaz as an ‘unintentional deviationist.’ History is discussed vis-a-vis the radio politics of young Eddy Chibas, the slave abolitionist rhetoric of the Countess of Merlin, and the creole appropriation of Afro-Cuban dance and music to create sabor during the late nineteenth century.

Cuban Studies 44

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section. Cuban Studies 44 features a dossier on the Cuban economy that covers economic problems and causation since 2010 and their possible remedy; tax reform from 2010 to 2014; the reconfiguration of social and economic actors since 2011 and the prospects of a market economy; the functioning of state-owned companies within current restructuring policies; and changes in Cuba’s trade deficit since 2009. Other topics include the consequences of the “Special Period” and the de/reconstruction of the “New Socialist Man”; public health care policies in the post-Soviet era; the Wallace Stevens poem “Academic Discourse at Havana”; U.S. General Fitzhugh Lee’s role in Cuban independence; Jose Marti’s death as a myth of the Cuban nation-building project; “Operation Pedro Pan” and the framing of childhood memories in the Cuban American community; and the social and political control of nonconformists in 1960s Cuba.

Cuban Studies 43

Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section. Beginning with Cuban Studies 34, the publication is available electronically through Project MUSE¨. More information can be found at http://muse.jhu.edu/browse/publishers/pitt_press#limit_content_type=journal

Cuban Studies 43 is the first volume of the Cuban Studies series produced under a new editorial team based at Harvard University. In addition to papers in history, culture and politics, this volume contains a central dossier on demography. This dossier charts some of the important changes experienced by the Cuban population—a concept that of course includes those living abroad—and some of the challenges posed by those changes (such as aging, or the changing composition of the expatriate community). A paper in the dossier looks carefully at infant mortality figures and raises poignant questions concerning methodologies and results.

Queloides

Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art

Queloides catalogs an art exhibit on the persistence of racism and racial discrimination in contemporary Cuba. Despite the social transformations implemented by the Cuban revolutionary government since the early 1960s, racism continues to be a deep wound in Cuban society, one that generates countless social and cultural scars. In response to the official silence surrounding racial issues in Cuba, the twelve artists who participate in Queloides insist on the need to acknowledge and debate this social problem. This is the first time in post-revolutionary Cuba that the word “racism” has appeared in the title of an exhibition. The volume, which is bilingual in English and Spanish, includes several essays that analyze the work of these visual artists in the context of changes experienced by Cuban society since the 1990s, including the resurgence of racist attitudes and behaviors. “Queloides,” or “keloids,” are pathological, wound-induced scars. Although any injury may result in keloids, many people in Cuba believe that black skin is particularly susceptible to them. Thus the title evokes the persistence of racial stereotypes and the traumatic process of dealing with racism, discrimination, and racist violence. Alejandro de la Fuente and Elio Rodríguez Valdés co-curated the exhibit, which was originally hosted at the Wifredo Lam Center of Contemporary Art in Havana, Cuba, and transferred to the Mattress Factory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.