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TitleAuthorDescription
Waiting for the LightAlicia Suskin OstrikerWhat is it like living today in the chaos of a city that is at once brutal and beautiful, heir to immigrant ancestors "who supposed their children's children would be rich and free?" What is it to live in the chaos of a world driven by "intolerable, unquenchable human desire?" How do we cope with all the wars? In the midst of the dark matter and dark energy of the universe, do we know what train we're on? In this cornucopia of a book, Ostriker finds herself immersed in phenomena ranging from a first snowfall in New York City to the Tibetan diaspora, asking questions that have no reply, writing poems in which "the arrow may be blown off course by storm and returned by miracle."

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Walking Back Up Depot StreetMinnie Bruce PrattIn Pratt's fourth volume of poems, Walking Back Up Depot Street , we are led by powerful images into what is both a story of the segregated rural South and the story of a white woman named Beatrice who is leaving that home for the postindustrial North. Beatrice searches for the truth behind the public story-the official history-of the land of her childhood. She struggles to free herself from the lies she was taught while growing up-and she finds the other people who are also on this journey.
Walls Behind the CurtainHarold SegelFor the first time, The Walls Behind the Curtain presents a collection of works from East European novelists, poets, playwrights, and essayists who wrote during or after their captivity under communism. Harold B. Segel paints a backdrop of the political culture and prison and labor camp systems of each country, then offers biographical information on individual writers and presents excerpts of their writing.
War of TitansJackie DiSalvoIn a dramatically original analysis, Jackie DiSalvo explores Blake’s reworking of Genesis and Paradise Lost in his prophetic poem The Four Zoas, creating a compelling new reading of both Milton and Blake. With informed argument and provocative insights, DiSalvo shows how Blake’s view of history prefigures the revaluation of our own myths of origin prompted by new political, psychological, and feminist perspectives.

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Wars in the Midst of PeacePatrick JamesViolent conflicts rooted in ethnicity have, unfortunately, become increasingly common throughout the world, particularly in countries recently liberated from authoritarianism. Using theory, case studies, and aggregate data, the essays in this volume address the difficulties facing contemporary leaders and offer potential solutions to the policy issues surrounding ethnic disputes.

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Wars in the Midst of PeaceDavid CarmentViolent conflicts rooted in ethnicity have, unfortunately, become increasingly common throughout the world, particularly in countries recently liberated from authoritarianism. Using theory, case studies, and aggregate data, the essays in this volume address the difficulties facing contemporary leaders and offer potential solutions to the policy issues surrounding ethnic disputes.

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Wars in the WoodsSamuel HaysExamines the conflicts that have developed over the preservation of forests in America, and how government agencies and advocacy groups have influenced the management of forests and their resources for more than a century.

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Washed with SunJeremy FosterLooking mainly at the years following the British victory in the second Boer War, from 1902 to 1930, Foster examines the influence of painting, writing, architecture, and photography on the construction of a shared, romanticized landscape subjectivity that was perceived as inseparable from “being South African”, and thus helped forge the imagined community of white South Africa.
Washed with SunJeremy FosterLooking mainly at the years following the British victory in the second Boer War, from 1902 to 1930, Foster examines the influence of painting, writing, architecture, and photography on the construction of a shared, romanticized landscape subjectivity that was perceived as inseparable from “being South African”, and thus helped forge the imagined community of white South Africa.
Water Between UsShara McCallumIn the winner of the 1999 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize, Shara McCallum presents a poetic examination of cultural fragmentation, and the struggle of those in exile to reconcile the disparate and often conflicting influences of the homeland and the adopted country.

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Water PuppetsQuan BarryWinner of the 2010 Donald Hall Prize in Poetry

Quan Barry explores the universal image of war as evidenced in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as Vietnam, the country of her birth. She also turns her signature lyricism to other topics such as the beauty of Peru or the paintings of Ana Fernandez.

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We FishOmari DanielA dialogue between father and son, combining prose and poetry, that uses fishing as a shared activity and a metaphor, to address the universal challenge of raising good children. The lessons they share have the power to save a generation of young black men.

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We FishJack DanielA dialogue between father and son, combining prose and poetry, that uses fishing as a shared activity and a metaphor, to address the universal challenge of raising good children. The lessons they share have the power to save a generation of young black men.

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Wealth, Waste, and AlienationKenneth WarrenDrawing on economic, technological, labor, and environmental history, Kenneth Warren explains the birth, phenomenal growth, decline and death of the Connellsville coke industry—the region that made Pittsburgh steel world famous.

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Weather CentralTed KooserTed Kooser’s third book in the Pitt Poetry Series is a selection of poems published in literary journals over a ten year period by a writer whose work has been praised for its clarity and accessiblity, its mastery of figurative language, and its warmth and charm.

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WeedsZachary FalckA comprehensive history of “happenstance plants” in American urban environments. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing to the present, Falck examines the proliferation, perception, and treatment of weeds in metropolitan centers from Boston to Los Angeles.
WeedsZachary FalckA comprehensive history of “happenstance plants” in American urban environments. Beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing to the present, Falck examines the proliferation, perception, and treatment of weeds in metropolitan centers from Boston to Los Angeles.
Weimar Prussia, 1918–1925Dietrich OrlowOrlow demonstrates that the success of parliamentary democracy in Prussia during the Weimar Republic found its roots in the strength of national unity developed during the nineteenth century, and the work of Catholics, Social Democrats, and Liberals during the time of Republic.

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Weimar Prussia, 1925–1933Dietrich OrlowWith the development of a strong parliamentary system, Orlow shows how close Prussia came to realizing its goal of lasting democracy for the entire Reich, and how far it fell when the Nazis took power.

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WelfareNicholas RescherNicholas Rescher examines the controversial social issue of the welfare state, and offers philosophical views on the limits and liabilities of government and society.

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Were Our Mouths Filled With SongEric FriedlandSince the period in which the Jewish liturgy was standardized, there has hardly been a time when it was not somehow in a state of flux. Eric L. Friedland explores the countless ways that the Siddur, Mahzor, and Haggadah have been adjusted, amplified, or transformed so as to faithfully mirror modern Jews' understanding of themselves, their place in society, and their sancta. In the tradition of liturgologists such as Elbogen, Idelsohn, and Petuchowski, Friedland focuses on latter-day adaptations of the prayerbook, giving proper recognition to the recent concern for intellectual integrity, cultural congruity, group and individual self-redefinition, and honest speech in Jewish prayer.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Were Our Mouths Filled With SongEric FriedlandSince the period in which the Jewish liturgy was standardized, there has hardly been a time when it was not somehow in a state of flux. Eric L. Friedland explores the countless ways that the Siddur, Mahzor, and Haggadah have been adjusted, amplified, or transformed so as to faithfully mirror modern Jews' understanding of themselves, their place in society, and their sancta. In the tradition of liturgologists such as Elbogen, Idelsohn, and Petuchowski, Friedland focuses on latter-day adaptations of the prayerbook, giving proper recognition to the recent concern for intellectual integrity, cultural congruity, group and individual self-redefinition, and honest speech in Jewish prayer.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
What Makes a Good Experiment?Allan Franklin What makes a good experiment? Although experimental evidence plays an essential role in science, there is no algorithm or simple set of criteria for ranking or evaluating good experiments, and therefore no definitive answer to the question. Experiments can, in fact, be good in any number of ways: conceptually good, methodologically good, technically good, and pedagogically important. This book provides details of good experiments, with examples from physics and biology.
What Things Are Made Of Charles Harper WebbPowerful immersions in what it means to be human, these poems explore the spectrum of emotions from love to hate, tenderness to brutality. They can be withering and vulnerable in the same breath. Models of clarity and vividness, they are mysterious when they need to be, ranging from lyric to narrative, from realism to wild surreal flights, powered by a fierce, compassionate intelligence.

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What’s a Coal Miner to Do? Keith DixThis book explores the impact of technology on coal miners and operators. Dix reconstructs the history of the “hand-loading” era, then views the evolution of mechanical coal technology, the rise of the United Mine Workers, and the expanded role of the state under New Deal legislation.

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When They Hid the FireDaniel FrenchDaniel French examines the American social perceptions of electricity as an energy technology between the mid-19th and early decades of the 20th centuries. Arguing that both technical and cultural factors played a role, French shows how electricity became an invisible and abstract form of energy in American society, leading Americans to culturally construct electricity as unlimited and environmentally inconsequential—a newfound “basic right” of life in the United States.

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When Thy King Is A BoyEd RobersonC.D. Wright has described Roberson’s work as “lyric poetry of meticulous design and lasting emotional significance," comparing its musical qualities to the work of saxophonist Steve Lacy, jazz pianist Thelonious Monk, and composer Johann Sebastian Bach.
Where the Evidence LeadsDick ThornburghDick Thornburgh, former Governor of Pennsylvania and U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Reagan and Bush, reveals painful details of his personal life, including the 1960 automobile accident that claimed the life of his first wife and permanently disabled his infant son. He presents a frank analysis of the challenges of raising a family as a public figure, and tells the moving story of his personal and political crusade that culminated in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

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WhirlwindSharon DolinWhirlwind is one woman’s heartfelt, yet mordantly witty, sexy exploration of the breakup of a marriage in poems that keep their linguistic edge while seething with a story they must tell.

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Visit Sharon Dolin’s web site

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Whiskey RebelsLeland BaldwinA succinct account of the Whiskey Rebellion of 1794 in Western Pennsylvania, recalling the economic and sociological factors that led to this historic uprising.

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White PapersMartha CollinsWhite Papers is a series of untitled poems that explore race from a variety of personal, historical, and cultural perspectives, questioning what it means to be “white” in a multi-racial society.

Winner of the 2013 Ohioana Book Award for Poetry

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Visit Martha Collins’ personal web site.

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White Spots—Black SpotsAdam Daniel RotfeldThis pioneering study, prepared by the officially sanctioned Polish-Russian Group on Difficult Matters, is a comprehensive effort to document and fully disclose the major conflicts and interrelations between the two nations from 1918 to 2008. This is the English translation of this major study, which has received acclaim for its Polish and Russian editions. The chapters offer parallel histories by prominent Polish and Russian scholars who recount each country’s version of the event in question. Among the topics discussed are the 1920 Polish-Russian war, the origins of World War II and the notorious Hitler-Stalin pact, the infamously shrouded Katyn massacre, the communization of Poland, Cold War relations, the Solidarity movement and martial law, and the renewed relations of contemporary Poland and Russia.

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White Spots—Black SpotsAnatoly TorkunovThis pioneering study, prepared by the officially sanctioned Polish-Russian Group on Difficult Matters, is a comprehensive effort to document and fully disclose the major conflicts and interrelations between the two nations from 1918 to 2008. This is the English translation of this major study, which has received acclaim for its Polish and Russian editions. The chapters offer parallel histories by prominent Polish and Russian scholars who recount each country’s version of the event in question. Among the topics discussed are the 1920 Polish-Russian war, the origins of World War II and the notorious Hitler-Stalin pact, the infamously shrouded Katyn massacre, the communization of Poland, Cold War relations, the Solidarity movement and martial law, and the renewed relations of contemporary Poland and Russia.

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Who Says?William DeGenaro Scholars of rhetoric, composition, and communications analyze how discourse is used to construct working-class identities. The essays connect working-class identity to issues of race, gender, and sexuality, among others.

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Widening Spell of the LeavesLarry LevisThe result is a book of discursive meditations that will amply reward the reader. Part travelogue, part pilgrimage in which the shrines remain hidden until they are recognized later, Larry Levis’s startling and complex fifth book of poems is about the enslavement to desire for personal freedom, and the awareness of its price.

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Wild HundredsNate MarshallWinner of the 2014 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize
Winner of the 2017 Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award
Winner, 2016 BCALA Literary Award, Poetry Category
Finalist, 2015 NAACP Image Awards, poetry category

Wild Hundreds is a long love song to Chicago. The book celebrates the people, culture, and places often left out of the civic discourse and the travel guides. Wild Hundreds is a book that displays the beauty of black survival and mourns the tragedy of black death.

See Nate Marshall’s video page of readings, etc.

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Wild Man WithinMaximillian NovakThese essays trace the myth of the wild man from the Middle Ages to its disintegration into symbol in the periods following the discovery of America and encounter with real “wild men.” This is the first book to discuss the concept of wildness in the writings of the Enlightenment period in Western Europe.

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Wild Man WithinEdward DudleyThese essays trace the myth of the wild man from the Middle Ages to its disintegration into symbol in the periods following the discovery of America and encounter with real “wild men.” This is the first book to discuss the concept of wildness in the writings of the Enlightenment period in Western Europe.

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Will to CreateAstrida TantilloBetter known as a poet and dramatist, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832) was also a learned philosopher and natural scientist. Astrida Orle Tantillo offers the first comprehensive analysis of his natural philosophy, which she contends is rooted in creativity.

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Will to CreateAstrida TantilloBetter known as a poet and dramatist, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749–1832) was also a learned philosopher and natural scientist. Astrida Orle Tantillo offers the first comprehensive analysis of his natural philosophy, which she contends is rooted in creativity.

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William Whewell's Theory of Scientific MethodRobert ButtsWilliam Whewell is considered one of the most important nineteenth-century British philosophers of science and a contributor to modern philosophical thought, particularly regarding the problem of induction and the logic of discovery. In this volume, Robert E. Butts offers selections from Whewell's most important writings, and analysis of counter-claims to his philosophy.

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WindfallMaggie AndersonA selection of poems from three previous books as well as new work, Anderson writes out of deep grief for the political losses of work and money. A counterpoint to the sorrows in these poems is a wry, self-deprecating humor which saves the work from solemnity.
Window on Their WorldEdward FramFrom a manuscript that was lost for more than half a century comes new information about one of the greatest Jewish communities of all time. The court diaries of Rabbi Hayyim Gundersheim (d. 1795), a member of the rabbinic court of late eighteenth-century Frankfurt, sheds light on daily life in the Judengasse ("Jewish lane"). Edward Fram’s transcription gives readers access to this source, along with pertinent documents from Frankfurt’s community record book, important for the study of European Jewry on the eve of the Enlightenment.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Windows and StonesLeif SjobergAn International Poetry Forum Selection, translated from the Swedish by May Swenson with Leif Sjöberg.

Tomas Tranströmer 2011 Nobel Laureate in Literature

“Tomas Tranströmer, who is today one of Sweden’s most distinguished poets . . . can compare Lake Malar at dawn with a blue lamp, the islands creeping over the grass like nocturnal butterflies.”—New York Times

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Windows and StonesMay SwensonAn International Poetry Forum Selection, translated from the Swedish by May Swenson with Leif Sjöberg.

Tomas Tranströmer 2011 Nobel Laureate in Literature

“Tomas Tranströmer, who is today one of Sweden’s most distinguished poets . . . can compare Lake Malar at dawn with a blue lamp, the islands creeping over the grass like nocturnal butterflies.”—New York Times

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Windows and StonesTomas TranstromerAn International Poetry Forum Selection, translated from the Swedish by May Swenson with Leif Sjöberg.

Tomas Tranströmer 2011 Nobel Laureate in Literature

“Tomas Tranströmer, who is today one of Sweden’s most distinguished poets . . . can compare Lake Malar at dawn with a blue lamp, the islands creeping over the grass like nocturnal butterflies.”—New York Times

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Winter StarsLarry LevisSince the appearance of his first book in 1972, Larry Levis has been one of the most original and most highly praised of contemporary American poets. In Winter Stars, a book of love poems and elegies, Levis engages in a process of relentless self-interrogation about his life, about losses and acceptances. What emerges is not merely autobiography, but a biography of the reader, a “representative life” of our time.

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Wise ExtravaganceKenneth NealAndrew Carnegie, industrialist and a major American philanthropist, sought to bring world-class art and culture to Pittsburgh. This book looks at how the Carnegie International exhibit came into being in 1895, the early exhibitions, the art, artists, and the public reception to it.

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Wit’s EndSean ZwagermanWit's End is an original perspective on women's use of humor as a performative strategy, seen in works of twentieth-century American literature. Zwagerman argues that women, whose direct, explicit performative speech has been traditionally denied, or not taken seriously, have often turned to humor as a means of communicating with men.

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Without HistoryJosé RabasaRabasa offers new interpretations of the meaning of history from indigenous perspectives and develops the concept of a communal temporality that is not limited by time, but rather exists within the individual, community, and culture as a living knowledge that links both past and present. Rabasa recalls the works of Marx, Lenin, and Gramsci, and contemporary south Asian subalternists Ranajit Guha and Dipesh Chakrabarty, among others. He incorporates their conceptions of communality, insurgency, resistance to hegemonic governments, and the creation of autonomous spaces as strategies employed by indigenous groups around the globe, but goes further in defining these strategies as millennial and deeply rooted in Mesoamerican antiquity.

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Witness to the FiftiesConstance SchulzUnforgettable photographs from Roy Stryker's Pittsburgh Photographic Library (PPL) capture the convergence of destruction and rejuvenation that is the essence of an urban renaissance—all the anxiety and hope of the fifties is reflected in these poignant photographs and explained through essays and narrative.
Witness to the FiftiesConstance SchulzUnforgettable photographs from Roy Stryker's Pittsburgh Photographic Library (PPL) capture the convergence of destruction and rejuvenation that is the essence of an urban renaissance—all the anxiety and hope of the fifties is reflected in these poignant photographs and explained through essays and narrative.
Witness to the FiftiesClarke ThomasUnforgettable photographs from Roy Stryker's Pittsburgh Photographic Library (PPL) capture the convergence of destruction and rejuvenation that is the essence of an urban renaissance—all the anxiety and hope of the fifties is reflected in these poignant photographs and explained through essays and narrative.
Witness to the FiftiesClarke ThomasUnforgettable photographs from Roy Stryker's Pittsburgh Photographic Library (PPL) capture the convergence of destruction and rejuvenation that is the essence of an urban renaissance—all the anxiety and hope of the fifties is reflected in these poignant photographs and explained through essays and narrative.
Witness to the FiftiesSteven PlattnerUnforgettable photographs from Roy Stryker's Pittsburgh Photographic Library (PPL) capture the convergence of destruction and rejuvenation that is the essence of an urban renaissance—all the anxiety and hope of the fifties is reflected in these poignant photographs and explained through essays and narrative.
Witness to the FiftiesSteven PlattnerUnforgettable photographs from Roy Stryker's Pittsburgh Photographic Library (PPL) capture the convergence of destruction and rejuvenation that is the essence of an urban renaissance—all the anxiety and hope of the fifties is reflected in these poignant photographs and explained through essays and narrative.
Woman of the RiverClaribel AlegríaOne of the major voices in Latin American poetry confronts the political realities of contemporary Central America. The poems are richly human documents rooted in Alegria’s knowledge of and love for her subjects.
Woman of the RiverDarwin FlakollOne of the major voices in Latin American poetry confronts the political realities of contemporary Central America. The poems are richly human documents rooted in Alegria’s knowledge of and love for her subjects.
Women and the TradesElizabeth Beardsley ButlerChronicles the technological and organizational changes that transformed women's wage work in the early 1900's. Provides a comprehensive account of women's standing and the jobs they performed in the workforce. Part of the original sociological study, The Pittsburgh Survey, which was the first attempt to study life and labor in this industrial city.

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Women RabbisGary ZolaThis collection of essays, written by distinguished rabbis and scholars, seeks to examine the significance of women in the modern rabbinate. The essays address the history of women’s journey to ordination; how the existence of women rabbis changed and challenged Reform Judaism; the impact this transformation of the rabbinate had on liturgy and theology, Jewish identity, and Jewish communal leadership; and how women rabbis might affect the future of the rabbinate, congregational life, and Jewish communal life in the twenty-first century.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Women's PoetryDaisy FriedDaisy Fried’s third poetry collection is a book of unsettling, unsettled Americans. Fried finds her Americans everywhere, whether watching Henry Kissinger leave the Louvre, or trapped on a Tiber bridge by a crowd of neo-fascist thugs, or yearning outside a car detailing garage for a car lit underneath by neon lavender . . . She tells their stories with savage energy, wit, humor and political engagement.

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The poem “This Need Not Be a Comment on Death” was selected for the anthology The Best American Poetry 2013

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Words for Empty and Words for FullBob Hicok“As always with a Bob Hicok book, fascinating and a book you sort of can’t help but pick up and suddenly, two hours later, find yourself having read straight through. I can think of just about no contemporary poets who publish such consistently great work.”—Corduroy Books

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Workers and WelfareMichelle DionDion’ study examines the major political role of organized labor in establishing and effecting change in Mexico’s social protection programs throughout the twentieth-century.

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Workers’ StateMark PittawayA groundbreaking study of the complexities of the Hungarian working class, its relationship to the Communist Party, and its major political role during the foundational period of socialism (1944–1958).

Named an Outstanding Academic Title for 2013 by Choice Magazine
Working-Class LifePeter ShergoldThis book offers a comparative study of working-class life in Pittsburgh, PA and Birmingham, England in the early twentieth century.

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World ChangesPaul HorwichProminent philosophers analyze the work of Thomas Kuhn, including his monumental study The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, from a broad perspective, comparing earlier logical empiricism and logical positivism with the new philosophy inspired by Kuhn in the early 1960s.
World Falls AwayWanda ColemanWanda Coleman creates the kind of poetry that excites and ignites those who hate poetry, refreshes it for those who are bored by it, and inspires those who want to write it.

“In The World Falls Away, Wanda Coleman’s poems glow with an almost radioactive edginess. Yet, there is also range and substance giving her intense American voice staying power. To use, Whitman's word, her work has ‘amplitude.’” —Diane Wakoski

Winner of the 2012 annual Book Award presented by The Poetry Center, San Francisco State University.

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Watch Wanda Coleman read ‘Luvinda’ Watch an interview with Wanda Coleman by Poetry LA on You Tube

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World Observed/The World ConceivedHans RadderProvides an innovative analysis of the nature and interplay of observation and conceptualization. Radder shows that observation is always conceptually interpreted, and concepts affect the way observational processes are conducted in the first place.

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World Observed/The World ConceivedHans RadderProvides an innovative analysis of the nature and interplay of observation and conceptualization. Radder shows that observation is always conceptually interpreted, and concepts affect the way observational processes are conducted in the first place.

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World TreeDavid WojahnWorld Tree is in many respects, David Wojahn’s most ambitious collection to date; especially notable is a 25-poem sequence of ekphrastic poems, “Ochre,” which is accompanied by a haunting series of drawings and photographs of Neolithic Art and anonymous turn of the last century snapshot.

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Winner, 2012 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize from the Academy of American Poets

Co-winner of the 2013 Nicholas Roerich Museum Poets' Prize
World's Fairs on the Eve of WarMorris LowThis book considers representations of science and technology at world’s fairs as influential cultural forces and at a critical moment in history, when tensions and ideological divisions between political regimes would soon lead to war. It examines five fairs and expositions from across the globe—including three that were staged (Paris, 1937; Dusseldorf, 1937; and New York, 1939–40), and two that were in development before the war began but never executed (Tokyo, 1940; and Rome, 1942).

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World's Fairs on the Eve of WarRobert KargonThis book considers representations of science and technology at world’s fairs as influential cultural forces and at a critical moment in history, when tensions and ideological divisions between political regimes would soon lead to war. It examines five fairs and expositions from across the globe—including three that were staged (Paris, 1937; Dusseldorf, 1937; and New York, 1939–40), and two that were in development before the war began but never executed (Tokyo, 1940; and Rome, 1942).

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World's Fairs on the Eve of WarKaren FissThis book considers representations of science and technology at world’s fairs as influential cultural forces and at a critical moment in history, when tensions and ideological divisions between political regimes would soon lead to war. It examines five fairs and expositions from across the globe—including three that were staged (Paris, 1937; Dusseldorf, 1937; and New York, 1939–40), and two that were in development before the war began but never executed (Tokyo, 1940; and Rome, 1942).

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World's Fairs on the Eve of WarArthur MolellaThis book considers representations of science and technology at world’s fairs as influential cultural forces and at a critical moment in history, when tensions and ideological divisions between political regimes would soon lead to war. It examines five fairs and expositions from across the globe—including three that were staged (Paris, 1937; Dusseldorf, 1937; and New York, 1939–40), and two that were in development before the war began but never executed (Tokyo, 1940; and Rome, 1942).

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WPA History of the Negro in PittsburghLaurence GlascoThe first publication of a reclaimed WPA project studying Pittsburgh’s black population. The book features articles on civil rights, social class, lifestyle, culture, folklore, and institutions, from colonial times through the 1930s.

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WPA History of the Negro in PittsburghLaurence GlascoThe first publication of a reclaimed WPA project studying Pittsburgh’s black population. The book features articles on civil rights, social class, lifestyle, culture, folklore, and institutions, from colonial times through the 1930s.

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Writing against Racial InjuryHaivan HoangBringing together language and literacy studies, Asian American history and rhetoric, and critical race theory, Hoang uses historiography and ethnography to explore the politics of Asian American language and literacy education: the growth of Asian American student organizations and self-sponsored writing; the ways language served as thinly veiled trope for race in the influential Lau v. Nichols; the inheritance of a rhetoric of injury on college campuses; and activist rhetorical strategies that rearticulate Asian American racial identity.

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Writing at the End of the WorldRichard MillerRichard E. Miller questions the current views of the relationship between the humanities and daily life, and proposes that, in the face of increasing violence, the humanities should become more important, not less.

Winner of the 2006 CEE James H. Britton Award

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Writing on the MoveRebecca Lorimer LeonardLorimer Leonard shows how multilingual migrant women both succeed and struggle in their writing contexts. Based on a qualitative study of everyday multilingual writers in the United States, she shows how migrants’ literacies are revalued because they move with writers among their different languages and around the world. The book details the complicated reality of multilingual literacy, which is lived at the nexus of prejudice, prestige, and power.
Writing the Siege of LeningradNina PerlinaWriting the Siege of Leningrad tells of women’s experiences keeping the city alive and functioning during the 900 day Siege of Leningrad. Utilizing the words and descriptions of these women, Cynthia Simmons and Nina Perlina tell the story of a previously overlooked section of the population.

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Writing the Siege of LeningradCynthia SimmonsWriting the Siege of Leningrad tells of women’s experiences keeping the city alive and functioning during the 900 day Siege of Leningrad. Utilizing the words and descriptions of these women, Cynthia Simmons and Nina Perlina tell the story of a previously overlooked section of the population.

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Writing/TeachingPaul KameenIn Writing/Teaching Paul Kameen brings together essays examining the process of teaching and ones that look at the figures of teacher and student in contemporary education using the writings of Plato and Socrates.

Winner of the 2002 CCCC Outstanding Book Award

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WrongReginald ShepherdThe poems of Shepherd’s third book seek to redefine the meaning of mythology, from the ruined representatives of Greek divinity to the dazzling extravagances of predecessors like Hart Crane and Wallace Stevens.
WyndmereCarol MuskeWyndmere is a town in North Dakota where Carol Muske’s mother was born, and where she visited as a child. Muske’s grandparents are buried there, and it is where her mother met and married her father. Now almost a ghost town, Wyndmere is the source of imagery in many of these poems, as well as the idea of Wynd-mere, wind-mother, both inspiration and principle of separation.

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