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TitleAuthorDescription
M-80Jim DanielsIn M-80, his third book of poems, Jim Daniels explores the sharp edges of urban life. His characters struggle for survival in the face of rising urban violence, racial tension, and a crumbling economy. The collection is named for one of the most dangerous fireworks found on city streets - an apt metaphor for an urban world where the fuse is always lit.
Mad People’s History of MadnessDale PetersonA man desperately tries to keep his pact with the Devil, a woman is imprisoned in an insane asylum by her husband because of religious differences, and, on the testimony of a mere stranger, “a London citizen” is sentenced to a private madhouse. This anthology of writings by mad and allegedly mad people is a comprehensive overview of the history of mental illness for the past five hundred years-from the viewpoint of the patients themselves.

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Mad RiverJan BeattyWinner of the 1994 Agnes Starrett Poetry Prize and the 2000 Creative Achievement Award from the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust.
Maida SpringerYevette RichardsThe first full-length biography to document and analyze the central role played by Maida Springer in international affairs, Maida Springer explores how Springer’s experiences inspired her to become involved in the formation of AFL-CIO’s African policy during the Cold War and African independence movements. It also discusses the overall political and social situation during this time period.

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Making Citizens in ArgentinaDavid SheininMaking Citizens in Argentina charts the evolving meanings of citizenship in Argentina from the 1880s to the 1980s. Against the backdrop of immigration, science, race, sport, populist rule, and dictatorship, the contributors analyze the power of the Argentine state and other social actors to set the boundaries of citizenship.

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Making Citizens in ArgentinaBenjamin BryceMaking Citizens in Argentina charts the evolving meanings of citizenship in Argentina from the 1880s to the 1980s. Against the backdrop of immigration, science, race, sport, populist rule, and dictatorship, the contributors analyze the power of the Argentine state and other social actors to set the boundaries of citizenship.

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Making Common Sense of JapanSteven ReedSteven Reed takes on the task of demystifying Japanese culture and behavior. Through examples that are familiar to an American audience and his own personal encounters, he argues that the apparent oddity of Japanese behavior flows quite naturally from certain objective conditions that are different from those in the United States. Two aspects of the Japanese economy have particularly baffled Americans: that Japanese workers have “permanent employment” and that the Japanese government cooperates with big business. Reed explains these phenomena in common sense terms. He shows how they developed historically, why they continue, and why they helped produce economic growth. He concludes that these practices are in fact, not very different from the United States.

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Making of British Anthropology, 1813-1871Efram Sera-ShriarVictorian anthropology has been derided as an "armchair practice," distinct from the scientific discipline of the twentieth century. But the observational practices that characterized the study of human diversity developed from the established sciences of natural history, geography and medicine. Sera-Shriar argues that anthropology at this time went through a process of innovation which built on scientifically grounded observational study. Far from being an evolutionary dead end, nineteenth-century anthropology laid the foundations for the field-based science of anthropology today.

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Making of Modern Anthrax, 1875-1920James StarkFrom the mid-nineteenth century onwards a number of previously unknown conditions were recorded in both animals and humans. Known by a variety of names, and found in diverse locations, by the end of the century these diseases were united under the banner of "anthrax." Stark offers a fresh perspective on the history of infectious disease. He examines anthrax in terms of local, national and global significance, and constructs a narrative that spans public, professional and geographic domains.

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Making Regulatory PolicyJohn ThomasFew scholars have applied modern behavioral and organization theory to study U.S. regulatory agencies, and fewer still have integrated this approach with frameworks drawn from administrative law and analysis. This multidisciplinary collection combines detailed case studies with theoretical discussions drawing upon legal concepts, organizational analysis, and behavioral theory.

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Making Regulatory PolicyKeith HawkinsFew scholars have applied modern behavioral and organization theory to study U.S. regulatory agencies, and fewer still have integrated this approach with frameworks drawn from administrative law and analysis. This multidisciplinary collection combines detailed case studies with theoretical discussions drawing upon legal concepts, organizational analysis, and behavioral theory.

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Making Up SocietyPhilip FisherFisher places the work of George Eliot within the great evolution that constitutes the nineteenth-century English novel. He reports not only about her work, but about an evolving complex literary form.

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Makings of HappinessRonald WallaceWallace’s poems cover the range of human experience: music, religion, sex, art, childhood, adolescence, nuclear war, illness, and death. But it’s in his wit and good humor, against undercurrents of sorrow and grief that best characterize his poetry: part Emily Dickinson, and part Harpo Marx; part Woody Allen, and part Robert Frost.
Man and the Modern CityElizabeth GeenNo single view of American cities captures the many problems of urban life-whether the city is analyzed by a politician, an architect, an urban planner, a sociologist, or a psychologist. Man and the Modern City presents the view of ten distinguished urban critics whose variety of approaches places the crucial issues of the city in a broad perspective.

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Man and the Modern CityKenneth WalkerNo single view of American cities captures the many problems of urban life-whether the city is analyzed by a politician, an architect, an urban planner, a sociologist, or a psychologist. Man and the Modern City presents the view of ten distinguished urban critics whose variety of approaches places the crucial issues of the city in a broad perspective.

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Man and the Modern CityJeanne LoweNo single view of American cities captures the many problems of urban life-whether the city is analyzed by a politician, an architect, an urban planner, a sociologist, or a psychologist. Man and the Modern City presents the view of ten distinguished urban critics whose variety of approaches places the crucial issues of the city in a broad perspective.

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Man Who Loved LevittownW. D. WetherellWinner of the 1985 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. This book is characterized by narrative vitality and emotional range. In Wetherell’s stories a suburban retiree’s assumptions about the ethos of Long Island life are challenged and dismissed by a younger generation, a young English woman achieves miracles by dancing with wounded soldiers during World War II, a tennis-mad bachelor plays an interior game as real to him as an actual match, and a black drifter converts an Asian couple to his bleak vision of American life and finds strange kinship with them.

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Man Who Loved LevittownW. D. WetherellWinner of the 1985 Drue Heinz Literature Prize. This book is characterized by narrative vitality and emotional range. In Wetherell’s stories a suburban retiree’s assumptions about the ethos of Long Island life are challenged and dismissed by a younger generation, a young English woman achieves miracles by dancing with wounded soldiers during World War II, a tennis-mad bachelor plays an interior game as real to him as an actual match, and a black drifter converts an Asian couple to his bleak vision of American life and finds strange kinship with them.

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Man Who Loved the StarsJohn BrashearThe inspiring story of a man whose avocation as a stargazer and vocation as a millwright led to his development of lenses, mirrors and other astronomical apparatus. John A. Brashear's technological advances were later employed by astronomers in the United States and Europe. Brashear also attracted the friendship and financial support of astronomer Samuel Lagley, railroad magnate William Thaw, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Carnegie, who gave him $20,000 for the construction of Allegheny Observatory in Pittsburgh.

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Managing Literacy, Mothering AmericaSarah RobbinsSarah Robbins identifies and defines a new genre in American letters—the domestic literacy narrative—and provides a cultural history of its development throughout the nineteenth century.

Winner of an Outstanding Academic Title Award from Choice Magazine (2006).

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Managing National Security PolicyWilliam NewmannWilliam Newmann examines the ways in which presidents make national security decisions, and explores how those processes evolve over time. He creates a complex portrait of policy making, which may help future presidents design national security decision structures that fit the realities of the office in today's world.

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Managing National Security PolicyWilliam NewmannWilliam Newmann examines the ways in which presidents make national security decisions, and explores how those processes evolve over time. He creates a complex portrait of policy making, which may help future presidents design national security decision structures that fit the realities of the office in today's world.

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Managing the PresidencyColin CampbellWinner of the Richard Neustadt Award of the American Political Science Association

Campbell focuses on the institutional development of the presidency, and its advisers and staff, and assesses the Carter and Regan administrations within historical context.

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Manipulation of ConsentYoussef CohenYoussef Cohen examines the methods elites used to legitimatize their subjugation of subordinates in his case study of Brazil. He successfully blends theoretical exposition, conceptually informed historical analysis, and a wealth of empirical data.

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Manual for LivingSharon DolinManual for Living offers three distinct approaches to life, each one riven by flashes of joy and despair, and all conditions in between. As in all of her work, Dolin’s lyric voice attends to language and the world equally. Her verbal sleights-of-hand offer readers insights for ways to live. Manual for Living is a wise book: drink deeply from it.
Manufacturing a Socialist ModernityKimberly ZarecorThe first comprehensive history of architectural practice and the emergence of prefabricated housing in the Eastern Bloc. Through discussions of individual architects and projects, as well as building typologies, professional associations, and institutional organization, Zarecor opens a rare window into the cultural and economic life of Eastern Europe during the early postwar period.

Listen to Kimberly Zarecor discuss her book on an interview with New Books in History
Map of the Lost WorldRick HillesIf it’s largely true that all poets are love poets, then the poems of Rick Hilles’s A Map of the Lost World find their unifying power in the love of friendship, testing the bonds by which the family “we get to choose” may keep us whole, even beyond death.

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Matter of EmpireOrlando BentancorThis book examines the philosophical principles invoked by apologists of the Spanish empire that laid the foundations for the exploitation of the Andean region between 1520 and 1640. Orlando Bentancor ties the colonizers’ attempts to justify the abuses wrought on the environment and the indigenous population to their larger ideology concerning mining, science, and the empire's rightful place in the global sphere. To Bentancor, their presuppositions were a major turning point for colonial expansion and paved the way to global mercantilism.

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Matters of the Sea / Cosas del marRichard BlancoMatters of the Sea / Cosas del mar is a commemorative bilingual chapbook that beautifully reproduces Richard Blanco’s stirring poem presented during the historic reopening ceremony of the United States Embassy in Havana, Cuba, on August 14, 2015.

Matters of the Sea is one of the most emotionally complex and personal poems I’ve ever written, invested with all my love for the people of two countries that are part of my very being. As with the presidential inauguration in 2013, I am once again humbled and honored to participate as a poet in another historic moment of such significance. I’m elated by the power of poetry to mark such important, communal moments, and be a catalyst for change and understanding by reaching deep into our emotional selves and connecting us to our shared humanity.”
—Richard Blanco

Watch a You Tube video of Blanco’s reading at the U.S. Embassy reopening ceremony in Havana, Cuba

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Meaning of FreedomSeymour DrescherIn The Meaning of Freedom scholars from a wide variety of disciplines contemplate the aftermath of slavery, focusing on Caribbean societies and the southern United States. They attempt to answer the questions about culture, economics, and politics central to this issue.

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Meaning of FreedomFrank McGlynnIn The Meaning of Freedom scholars from a wide variety of disciplines contemplate the aftermath of slavery, focusing on Caribbean societies and the southern United States. They attempt to answer the questions about culture, economics, and politics central to this issue.

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Media, Sound, and Culture in Latin America and the CaribbeanAlejandra BronfmanThis volume presents an original analysis of the role of sound in Latin American and Caribbean societies, from the late nineteenth century to the present. The contributors examine the importance of sound in the purveyance of power, gender roles, race, community, religion, and populism. They also demonstrate how sound is essential to the formation of citizenship and nationalism.
Media, Sound, and Culture in Latin America and the CaribbeanAndrew Grant WoodThis volume presents an original analysis of the role of sound in Latin American and Caribbean societies, from the late nineteenth century to the present. The contributors examine the importance of sound in the purveyance of power, gender roles, race, community, religion, and populism. They also demonstrate how sound is essential to the formation of citizenship and nationalism.
Medical Trade Catalogue in Britain, 1870-1914Claire JonesBy the late nineteenth century, advances in medical knowledge, technology and pharmaceuticals led to the development of a thriving commercial industry. The medical trade catalogue became one of the most important means of promoting the latest tools and techniques to practitioners. Drawing on over 400 catalogues produced between 1870 and 1914, Jones presents a study of the changing nature of medical professionalism. She examines the use of the catalogue in connecting the previously separate worlds of medicine and commerce and discusses its importance to the study of print history more widely.

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Medicine and ModernismL. S. JacynaAn in-depth study of the English neurologist and polymath Sir Henry Head (1861–1940). Head bridged the gap between science and the arts. He was a published poet who had close links with such figures as Thomas Hardy and Siegfried Sassoon. His research into the nervous system and the relationship between language and the brain broke new ground.

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Medicine and Politics in Colonial PeruAdam WarrenAn original study examining the primacy placed on physicians and medical care to generate population growth and increase the workforce during the late eigteenth century in colonial Peru.

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Megarhetorics of Global Development Rebecca DingoThis volume examines rhetorical strategies used by multinational corporations, NGOs, governments, banks, and others to further their own economic, political, or technological agendas. These wide-ranging case studies employ rhetorical theory, globalization scholarship, and analysis of cultural and historical dynamics to offer critiques of development practices and their material effects.
Megarhetorics of Global Development J. Blake ScottThis volume examines rhetorical strategies used by multinational corporations, NGOs, governments, banks, and others to further their own economic, political, or technological agendas. These wide-ranging case studies employ rhetorical theory, globalization scholarship, and analysis of cultural and historical dynamics to offer critiques of development practices and their material effects.
Memoirs of Nahum N. GlatzerMichael FishbaneThe geographic, spiritual, and intellectual journeys of Nahum N. Glatzer (1903-1990)—prolific scholar, Brandeis University professor, and editor of the Schocken publishing house—reveal a rich cultural ambiance that no longer exists, as well as a breadth of perspective and learning that remains enviable in our time. Michael Fishbane’s detailed introduction sets these 78 memoir entries from the final decades of Glatzer’s life in the context of his life and work. A preface by Judith Glatzer Wechsler offers personal reflections on the character of her father and his work.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Memoirs of Nahum N. GlatzerJudith Glatzer WechslerThe geographic, spiritual, and intellectual journeys of Nahum N. Glatzer (1903-1990)—prolific scholar, Brandeis University professor, and editor of the Schocken publishing house—reveal a rich cultural ambiance that no longer exists, as well as a breadth of perspective and learning that remains enviable in our time. Michael Fishbane’s detailed introduction sets these 78 memoir entries from the final decades of Glatzer’s life in the context of his life and work. A preface by Judith Glatzer Wechsler offers personal reflections on the character of her father and his work.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Mental Health, Racism, and SexismCharles V. WillieThe essays in this volume offer powerful perspectives on the effects of racism and sexism on mental health care.

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Mental Health, Racism, and SexismBernard KramerThe essays in this volume offer powerful perspectives on the effects of racism and sexism on mental health care.

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Mental Health, Racism, and SexismBertram BrownThe essays in this volume offer powerful perspectives on the effects of racism and sexism on mental health care.

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Mental Health, Racism, and SexismPatricia Perri RiekerThe essays in this volume offer powerful perspectives on the effects of racism and sexism on mental health care.

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Merit of Our MothersTracy Guren KlirsWhile they may not have been able to help constitute a minyan, and while many did not know Hebrew or Aramaic, women produced and used material for prayer at home. These moving supplications (tkhines) in the Yiddish original and English translation reflect the most personal spiritual concerns of premodern Ashkenazic women. They are of great appeal and value to those who wish to hear the voices of Jewish women in history, study Yiddish literature and culture, or create new expressions of spirituality.

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Mestizaje Upside-DownJavier Sanjinés C.Mestizaje refers to the process of cultural, ethnic, and racial mixture that is part of cultural identity in Latin America. Through a careful study of fiction, political essays, and visual art, this book defines the meaning of mestizaje in the context of the emergence of a modern national and artistic identity in late-19th- and early 20th-century Bolivia.

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Metaethics, Egoism, and VirtueJames LennoxPhilosopher-novelist Ayn Rand (1905–1982) is a cultural phenomenon. Yet Rand’s work has until recently received little serious attention from academics. This new series seeks a fuller scholarly understanding of this highly original and influential thinker. The chapters in this volume address the basis of her egoism in a virtue-centered normative ethics; her account of how moral norms in general are themselves based on a fundamental choice by an agent to value his own life; and how her own approach to the foundations of ethics is to be compared and contrasted with familiar approaches in the analytic ethical tradition.
Metaethics, Egoism, and VirtueAllan GotthelfPhilosopher-novelist Ayn Rand (1905–1982) is a cultural phenomenon. Yet Rand’s work has until recently received little serious attention from academics. This new series seeks a fuller scholarly understanding of this highly original and influential thinker. The chapters in this volume address the basis of her egoism in a virtue-centered normative ethics; her account of how moral norms in general are themselves based on a fundamental choice by an agent to value his own life; and how her own approach to the foundations of ethics is to be compared and contrasted with familiar approaches in the analytic ethical tradition.
Metafictional MuseLarry McCafferyMcCaffery interprets the works of three major writers of radically experimental fiction: Robert Coover; Donald Barthelme; and Willam H. Gass.

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Metamorphosis of HeadsDenise Arnold Provides a comprehensive ethnography of writing in the Andes, and details the relationship between Andean peoples’ struggle to preserve their indigenous textual forms in the face of Western cirricula, with their struggle for land and power.

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Metamorphosis of HeadsDenise Arnold Provides a comprehensive ethnography of writing in the Andes, and details the relationship between Andean peoples’ struggle to preserve their indigenous textual forms in the face of Western cirricula, with their struggle for land and power.

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Metamorphosis of HeadsJuan de Dios YapitaProvides a comprehensive ethnography of writing in the Andes, and details the relationship between Andean peoples’ struggle to preserve their indigenous textual forms in the face of Western cirricula, with their struggle for land and power.

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Metamorphosis of HeadsJuan de Dios YapitaProvides a comprehensive ethnography of writing in the Andes, and details the relationship between Andean peoples’ struggle to preserve their indigenous textual forms in the face of Western cirricula, with their struggle for land and power.

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Metaphysics and ExplanationW. CapitanThis volume offers an unusual variety of topics presented during the fifth annual Oberlin Colloquium in Philosophy. Essays topics include: a dispute of the standard deductivist account of scientific testability; two definitions of “nonsense” that are closely related and correlate to science's concern with truth and philosophy's concern with concepts; contesting the causes of voluntary actions purported in Hart and Honoré's Causation and the Law; distinguishing two kinds of metaphysical tasks-taxonomic and evaluative; and discussions of “what a thing is” in terms of its qualities and particulars and the distinction between numerical and conceptual differences, universals and individuation.

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Metaphysics and ExplanationD. MerrillThis volume offers an unusual variety of topics presented during the fifth annual Oberlin Colloquium in Philosophy. Essays topics include: a dispute of the standard deductivist account of scientific testability; two definitions of “nonsense” that are closely related and correlate to science's concern with truth and philosophy's concern with concepts; contesting the causes of voluntary actions purported in Hart and Honoré's Causation and the Law; distinguishing two kinds of metaphysical tasks-taxonomic and evaluative; and discussions of “what a thing is” in terms of its qualities and particulars and the distinction between numerical and conceptual differences, universals and individuation.

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Metropolitan NaturesMichèle Dagenais Metropolitan Natures presents original histories of the diverse environments that constitute Montreal and its region. It explores the agricultural and industrial transformation of the metropolitan area, the interaction of city and hinterland, and the interplay of humans and nature.
Metropolitan NaturesStéphane Castonguay Metropolitan Natures presents original histories of the diverse environments that constitute Montreal and its region. It explores the agricultural and industrial transformation of the metropolitan area, the interaction of city and hinterland, and the interplay of humans and nature.
Mexican RepublicStanley GreenA colorful acccount of the first decade of Mexican independence from Spain., it views the failed attempt to establish a strong republic, the subsequent civil war that plagued the young nation, and the emergence of two polarized political parties.

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Mexico Through Russian Eyes, 1806-1940William RichardsonIn this unique book, William Richardson analyzes the descriptions given of Mexico by an assortment of Russian visitors, from the early nineteenth through the twentieth century. He finds that Russians had a particular empathy for the Mexicans, sharing a perceived similarity in their histories: conquest by a foreign power; a long period of centralized, authoritarian rule; an attempt at liberal reform followed by revolution.

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Microeconomic LawsAlexander RosenbergRosenberg applies current thinking in philosophy of science to neoclassical economics in order to assess its claims to scientific standing. Although philosophers have used history and psychology as paradigms for the examination of social science, there is good reason to believe that economics is a more appropriate subject for analysis: it is the most systematized and quantified of the social sciences; its practitioners have reached a measure of consensus on important aspects of their subject; and it encompasses a large number of apparently law-like propositions.

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Middle of the WorldKathleen Norris 
Militarization and Demilitarization in El Salvador’s Transition to DemocracyKnut Walter With the resignation of General Renee Emilio Ponce in March 1993, the army’s sixty-year domination of El Salvador came to an end. The country’s January 1992 peace accords stripped the military of its power, placing many areas under civilian rule. Establishing civilian control during the transition to democracy was no easy task—El Salvador had never been a democracy.

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Militarization and Demilitarization in El Salvador’s Transition to DemocracyPhilip WilliamsWith the resignation of General Renee Emilio Ponce in March 1993, the army’s sixty-year domination of El Salvador came to an end. The country’s January 1992 peace accords stripped the military of its power, placing many areas under civilian rule. Establishing civilian control during the transition to democracy was no easy task—El Salvador had never been a democracy.

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Milk Black CarbonJoan Naviyuk KaneMilk Black Carbon works against the narratives of dispossession and survival that mark the contemporary experience of many indigenous people, and Inuit in particular. In this collection, autobiographical details – motherhood, marriage, extended family and its geographical context in the rapidly changing arctic – negotiate arbitrary landscapes of our perplexing frontiers through fragmentation and interpretation of conventional lyric expectations.

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Milkweed LadiesLouise McNeillThe Milkweed Ladies, the memoirs of poet Louise McNeill, is written out of deep affection for and intimate knowledge of the lives of rural people and the rhythms of the natural world. It is a personal account of the farm in southern West Virginia where her family has lived for nine generations. It also, however extends beyond life on a single farm with repeated intrusions from larger world events.

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Mimi's TrapezeJ. Allyn RosserRosser's poems explore some of the darker corners of the human panorama—failure, loss, disillusionment—but always brightening them with humor and her playful attention to the compensatory alchemy of language, which can transform the sometimes base metals of our lives to noble ones.

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Mind of WinterWilliam BevisBevis examines the most puzzling and least studied aspect of Wallace Stevens’ poetry: detachment.

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Mind That Found ItselfClifford BeersAt once a classic account of the ravages of mental illness and a major American autobiography, A Mind That Found Itself tells the story of a young man who is gradually enveloped by a psychosis. His well-meaning family commits him to a series of mental hospitals, but he is brutalized by the treatment, and his moments of fleeting sanity become fewer and fewer. His ultimate recovery is a triumph of the human spirit.
MindscapesMartin CarrierWinner of the the 2016 Southern Cone Studies Section Social Sciences Book Award from the Latin American Studies Association

The philosophy of the mind is at the central core of this volume. Essays examine topics such as folk psychology, neuropsychology, psychoanalytic theory, the role of mental content in voluntary action, the functional and qualitative properties of color, meanings as conceptual structures, cognitive luck, and animal cognition.

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MindscapesPeter MachamerWinner of the the 2016 Southern Cone Studies Section Social Sciences Book Award from the Latin American Studies Association

The philosophy of the mind is at the central core of this volume. Essays examine topics such as folk psychology, neuropsychology, psychoanalytic theory, the role of mental content in voluntary action, the functional and qualitative properties of color, meanings as conceptual structures, cognitive luck, and animal cognition.

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Mister Rogers’ NeighborhoodMargaret Mary KimmelMark Collins and Margaret Mary Kimmel detail the story of Pennsylvania native Fred Rogers and his classic PBS children’s program Mister Roger’s Neighborhood.

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Mister Rogers’ NeighborhoodMark CollinsMark Collins and Margaret Mary Kimmel detail the story of Pennsylvania native Fred Rogers and his classic PBS children’s program Mister Roger’s Neighborhood.

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Modalities in Medieval Jewish Law for Public Order and SafetyStephen PassamaneckHebrew Union College Annual is the flagship journal of Hebrew Union College Press and the primary face of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion to the academic world. From its inception in 1924, its goal has been to cultivate Jewish learning and facilitate the dissemination of cutting-edge scholarship across the spectrum of Jewish Studies, including Bible, Rabbinics, Language and Literature, History, Philosophy, and Religion.
Models of NatureDouglas WeinerModels of Nature studies the early and turbulent years of the Soviet conservation movement from the October Revolution to the mid-1930s—Lenin’s rule to the rise of Stalin. This new edition includes an afterword by the author that reflects upon the study's impact and discusses advances in the field since the book was first published.
Moderation DilemmaAnya BernsteinAnya Bernstein offers a unique perspective on one of the few major policy innovations of the 1990s, and on the contentious issue of the role of the state in legislating family and medical leaves in the United States.

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Modern Architecture in Mexico CityKathryn O’RourkeKathryn E. O’Rourke offers a new interpretation of the development of modern architecture in the Mexican capital, showing close links between design, evolving understandings of national architectural history, folk art, and social reform.

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Modern Jewish MythologiesGlenda AbramsonBased on the Mason Lectures delivered at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies in the winter of 1995, the ten essays in this volume demonstrate the function and dynamic effect of Jewish mythologies in social, political, and psychological life. Essays treat topics including the Golem, the male superhero in Zionist myth, feminist treatments of Sarah, the role of the chevrah kaddisha, Kafka’s animal fables, and the role of myth in Jewish remembrance.

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Moment of MovementLynne Anne BlomThis classic book is a practical and philosophical exploration of dance improvisation, providing hundreds of ideas.

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Moment of MovementL. Tarin Chaplin This classic book is a practical and philosophical exploration of dance improvisation, providing hundreds of ideas.

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Moral Dimensions of Public Policy ChoiceMaurice WadeCombining philosophy with practical politics, an expanding area of policy studies applies moral precepts, critical principles, and conventional values to collective decisions. This evolving new approach to policy analysis asserts that the same variety of ethical principles available to the individual are also available to make collective decisions in the public interest and should be used.

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Moral Dimensions of Public Policy ChoiceJohn Martin GillroyCombining philosophy with practical politics, an expanding area of policy studies applies moral precepts, critical principles, and conventional values to collective decisions. This evolving new approach to policy analysis asserts that the same variety of ethical principles available to the individual are also available to make collective decisions in the public interest and should be used.

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More Money than GodRichard MichelsonMichelson’s poems explore the boundaries between the personal and the political, and the connections between history and memory. Growing up under the shadow of the Holocaust, in a Brooklyn neighborhood consumed with racial strife, Michelson’s experiences were far from ordinary. His sense of humor and acute awareness of Jewish history, with its ancient emphasis on the fundamental worth of human existence make this accessible book, finally, celebratory and life-affirming.

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More than MoonshineSidney Saylor FarrKentucky native Sydney Saylor Farr produces a cookbook and a narrative that recounts the way of life of southern Appalachia from the 1940s to 1983. It evokes the powerful link between food and a sense of place.

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Moscovia of Antonio Possevino, S.J.Hugh GrahamA descriptive account of the court of Tsar Ivan IV, in sixteenth-century Moscow, as seen through the eyes of papal envoy and Jesuit Antonio Possevino S.J.

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Moscovia of Antonio Possevino, S.J.Antonio Possevino S.J.A descriptive account of the court of Tsar Ivan IV, in sixteenth-century Moscow, as seen through the eyes of papal envoy and Jesuit Antonio Possevino S.J.

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Mother/Child PapersAlicia Suskin OstrikerIn 1970, as the war in Vietnam was heating up, Ostriker was awaiting the birth of her son. On April 30, President Nixon announced the bombing of Cambodia. On May 14, four students were shot and killed by National Guardsmen at Kent State University. The poems in this collection confront Ostriker’s personal tumult as she considered the world she had brought her son into.

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Motives for MetaphorJames SeitzSince metaphor, by its very definition, brings two different entities together, James Seitz argues that it is the key to successfully integrating the seemingly different disciplines that make up English studies.

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MOVE Crisis in PhiladelphiaHizkias AssefaExamines the 1985 confrontation between police and members of the black counterculture group MOVE, which ended in the destruction of sixty-one homes and the death of eleven residents—five of them children. Sheds light on relevant issues such as negotiating with "irrational" adversaries and problems of perception and misperception when different cultures clash.
MOVE Crisis in PhiladelphiaPaul Wahrhaftig Examines the 1985 confrontation between police and members of the black counterculture group MOVE, which ended in the destruction of sixty-one homes and the death of eleven residents—five of them children. Sheds light on relevant issues such as negotiating with "irrational" adversaries and problems of perception and misperception when different cultures clash.
Mr. Goodman the PlayerJohn WilsonThe fascinating life story of Cardell Goodman, a seventeenth-century Englishman who led an outlandish, turbulent life in the company of royalty and robbers.

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Multimodal Literacies and Emerging GenresTracey BowenMultimodal Literacies and Emerging Genres examines the possibilities, challenges, and realities of mutimodal composition as an effective means of communication. The chapters view the ways that writing instructors and their students are exploring the spaces where communication occurs, while also asking “what else is possible.”

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Multimodal Literacies and Emerging GenresCarl WhithausMultimodal Literacies and Emerging Genres examines the possibilities, challenges, and realities of mutimodal composition as an effective means of communication. The chapters view the ways that writing instructors and their students are exploring the spaces where communication occurs, while also asking “what else is possible.”

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Music for a WeddingLauren ClarkWinner of the 2016 Donald Hall Prize in Poetry

Lauren Clark’s poems move lucidly, depicting beautiful struggles of distrust, dream, grief, and intimacy. They show such conflicts through entrancing narrative drive and song-like abandon. In their unpredictable, unforgettable language, they make pain a tonic for pleasure, sorrow ground for revelation. This is a book that is celebratory, gentle, and queer.
My Brother is Getting Arrested Again Daisy FriedA new more mature Daisy Fried, writing about grown-up problems with the same insouciance and even more range and skill.

Finalist, 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award

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My Dear DaughterEdward FramTo teach observance of the three women's commandments—the laws of challah, Sabbath candles, and menstrual separation—in a systematic and impersonal manner, Rabbi Benjamin Slonik (ca. 1550-1620) harnessed the relatively new technology of printing and published a how-to pamphlet for women in the Yiddish vernacular. Fram transcribes, translates, and analyzes Slonik's pamphlet and presents a treasure trove of information about the place and roles of women in late sixteenth-century Polish-Jewish society.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
My Dear DaughterEdward FramTo teach observance of the three women's commandments—the laws of challah, Sabbath candles, and menstrual separation—in a systematic and impersonal manner, Rabbi Benjamin Slonik (ca. 1550-1620) harnessed the relatively new technology of printing and published a how-to pamphlet for women in the Yiddish vernacular. Fram transcribes, translates, and analyzes Slonik's pamphlet and presents a treasure trove of information about the place and roles of women in late sixteenth-century Polish-Jewish society.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
My Father's GeographyAfaa Michael Weaver"Weaver's life studies and lyrics are imbued with a vivid sense of language, a vivid sense of the world, a vivid sense of their inseparability. And his tonal range—from unabashed passion to the subtlest velleity—is impressive indeed. This is a singular talent."—Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
My Missions for Revolutionary Bolivia, 1944-1962Victor AndradeAndrade presents a candid insider’s view of U.S.-Bolivian relations which will sometimes make Americans feel proud, and other times ashamed. He describes meetings with Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, and many others.

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Mystery TrainDavid WojahnDavid Wojahn deftly mixes personal history and recollections with a wide range of character studies and monologues, but the center of this book is a sequence of thirty-five poems, mainly sonnets, in which rock and roll music is a strange, kaleidoscopic mirror of recent American history. Combining rhapsodic homage, grim humor, human folly, and tragedy, these poems are like nothing else in contemporary poetry.

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Myths of Harmony Marixa LassoMyths of Harmony examines a foundational moment for Latin American racial constructs. While most contemporary scholarship has focused the explanation for racial tolerance in the colonial period, Marixa Lasso argues that the origins of modern race relations are to be found later, in the Age of Revolution. Lasso's work brings much-needed attention to the important role of the anticolonial struggles in shaping the nature of contemporary race relations and racial identities in Latin America.

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