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TitleAuthorDescription
Abraham Geiger & Liberal JudaismMax WienerAbraham Geiger gave the Reform Movement in Judaism its intellectual stature and theoretical justification. The late Dr. Max Wiener here offers a sympathetic and balanced biographical introduction to Geiger, followed by English translations of select letters and excerpts from Geiger’s works, as well as sermons and articles written by Geiger. This volume will be of interest to anyone who seeks to understand the intellectual roots of liberal Judaism.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Agony in the PulpitMarc SapersteinSermons delivered by rabbis during the years between 1933 and 1945 describing and protesting against the ever-growing oppression of European Jews have been largely neglected. Agony in the Pulpit is a response to this neglect, and to the accusations made by respected figures that Jewish leaders remained silent in the wake of catastrophe. The passages from sermons reproduced in this volume—delivered by 135 rabbis in 15 countries, though mainly from the United States and England—provide important evidence of how these rabbis communicated the ever-worsening news to their congregants, especially on important religious occasions when they had peak attendance and peak receptivity.
American Jewish LiturgiesSharona WachsWachs’ American Jewish Liturgies offers scholars, rabbis, and anyone interested in liturgical history a bibliography of Jewish liturgy published in the United States up to 1925. With 1,300 separate entries that catalogue prayerbooks, devotionals, memorials, children's prayers, hymnals, and scores, it attempts to be as comprehensive as possible and represents the very first time such an extensive bibliography has been brought together on the topic. It is invaluable for the information it provides on the creation, evolution, and distribution of Jewish liturgy in the United States through 1925.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Baraita De-Melekhet Ha-MishkanRobert KirschnerA scientific edition of the rabbinic work concerned with the desert tabernacle described in Exodus 25-36, 35-39, and Numbers 3-4.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Between Snow and Desert HeatRina LapidusHebrew literature, from the second half of the nineteenth century to well into the twentieth, was unmistakably influenced in style and substance by Russian prose and poetry. These influences have been readily acknowledged but have been studied only in an episodic and fragmented way. Rina Lapidus systematically identifies those Hebrew authors and poets upon whom Russian influence is most striking and upon whom it seems to have exerted the greatest power.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Beyond Survival and PhilanthropyAllon GalSometimes agreeing, sometimes disagreeing, but always expanding upon these presentations, authors of the response essays in the volume reflect and underscore the values that precipitated this discussion: recognition of the unity of the Jewish people and of the continuing to share diverse views and opinions in order to formulate and address the crucial and sometimes radical choices that confront American Jewry and Israel. Beyond Survival and Philanthropy is a collection of answers to this complex question offered by thirty-one leading Israeli and American scholars, educators, journalists, and communal leaders.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Devotion and CommandmentArthur GreenArthur Green uses the Hasidic debate on the patriarchs and the commandments as a point of departure for a wide-ranging consideration of the relationship between piety and commandment in Hasidic Judaism. The result is a series of remarkable mystical defenses of the commandments and an original contribution of Hasidic thought to the ongoing history of Judaism.

Kindle eBook Available

Nook eBook Available
Drawing the HolocaustMichael KrausFifteen-year-old Michael Kraus began keeping a diary while he was still living at home in the Czech city of Nachód but continued writing while a prisoner at Theresienstadt (Terezín). His memoir, originally written in Czech, and significant for having been written so close to the author’s liberation, is made available to English readers for the first time. It also reproduces pages from the that show how the teenage Kraus illustrated his memories with pencil drawings that both complement and extend his personal Holocaust story.

Kindle eBook Available

Nook eBook Available
Engaging TorahWalter Homolka Eminent Jewish scholars from around the world present introductions to the different parts of the Bible for the wider public. The essays offer a general introduction to the Torah in Jewish life and include specific essays on each of the Five Books of Moses, as well as on the Haftarot, Neviim, and Ketuvim.
Exile as HomeJordan FinkinLeyb Naydus (1890–1918) expanded the possibilities of Yiddish poetry via his rich cosmopolitan works, introducing a wealth of themes and forms seldom seen in that language, including some of its first sonnets of literary merit. Literary critic Naftoli Vaynig’s lengthy essay on Naydus, written in 1943 in the Vilne Ghetto, makes a remarkable case for why the poems of this cosmopolitan aesthete, who died so tragically young, should serve as a fitting emblem for a culture threatened with extinction. Exile as Home, which includes a translation of Vaynig’s essay, 'Naydus Studies', extends that argument.
Exile in AmsterdamMarc SapersteinExile in Amsterdam is based on a rich, extensive, and previously untapped source for one of the most important Jewish communities in early modern Europe: the sermons of Saul Levi Morteira (ca. 1596-1660), leading rabbi of Amsterdam and a master of Jewish homiletical art. After years of painstaking study from microfilms and three trips to Budapest to consult the actual manuscripts, Marc Saperstein has written the first comprehensive analysis of the historical significance of these texts, some of which were heard by the young Spinoza, and offers annotated English translations of eight examples.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Exile in AmsterdamMarc SapersteinExile in Amsterdam is based on a rich, extensive, and previously untapped source for one of the most important Jewish communities in early modern Europe: the sermons of Saul Levi Morteira (ca. 1596-1660), leading rabbi of Amsterdam and a master of Jewish homiletical art. After years of painstaking study from microfilms and three trips to Budapest to consult the actual manuscripts, Marc Saperstein has written the first comprehensive analysis of the historical significance of these texts, some of which were heard by the young Spinoza, and offers annotated English translations of eight examples.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
German Jews beyond JudaismGeorge MosseJews were emancipated at a time when high culture was becoming an integral part of German citizenship. German Jews felt a powerful urge to integrate, to find their Jewish substance in German culture and craft an identity as both Germans and Jews. In this volume, based on the 1983 Efroymson Memorial Lectures given at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, George Mosse traces their pursuit of Bildung and German Enlightenment ideals and their efforts to influence German society even at a time when this led to intellectual isolation. Yet out of this German-Jewish dialogue, what had once been part of German culture became a central Jewish heritage.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Great Voice that Did Not CeaseMichael ChernickThe growth of the rabbinic canon may be best described as a hermeneutical endeavor. Michael Chernick demonstrates how hermeneutical methods helped the Rabbis confront the difficulties that arose when logical and interpretative problems appeared in scriptural and, later, rabbinic texts. Given the Rabbis' theological, literary, and rhetorical attitudes, these reading strategies were adopted to obviate the problem the texts presented. His study draws its title from the traditional view of Sinaitic revelation, when God spoke to the assembled people with "a great voice that did not cease" (kol gadol velo yasaf, Deut 5:19).

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Greening of American Orthodox JudaismBenny KrautYavneh serves as an illuminating historical marker by which to probe the evolution of American Orthodox Judaism from the 1960s to the early 1980s, when it ceased to exist. Yavneh and its members and supporters contributed significantly to the revitalization of Orthodoxy during this period but also experienced the same tensions felt across the movement during this period. Benny Kraut’s historical account brings this singular organization to public consciousness and offers a revealing glimpse of American Orthodox Judaism at a critical juncture in its recent growth.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Guidance, Not GovernanceJoan FriedmanThis pioneering study analyzes Freehof's responsa on a select number of topics that illustrate the evolution of American Reform Judaism in the second half of the twentieth century and assesses his role in guiding and shaping the movement.

Finalist, National Jewish Book Award

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Guidance, Not GovernanceJoan FriedmanThis pioneering study analyzes Freehof's responsa on a select number of topics that illustrate the evolution of American Reform Judaism in the second half of the twentieth century and assesses his role in guiding and shaping the movement.

Finalist, National Jewish Book Award

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Happiness in Premodern JudaismHava Tirosh-SamuelsonHava Tirosh-Samuelson shows that happiness is an important concept in Jewish discourse from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Notions of happiness are rooted in the intellectual culture of a given period, including cultural exchanges among Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Demonstrating the discourse on happiness as a dramatic interplay between Wisdom and Torah, between philosophy and religion, between reason and faith, Tirosh-Samuelson presents, to specialists and non-specialists alike, a fascinating tour of Jewish intellectual history.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Happiness in Premodern JudaismHava Tirosh-SamuelsonHava Tirosh-Samuelson shows that happiness is an important concept in Jewish discourse from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Notions of happiness are rooted in the intellectual culture of a given period, including cultural exchanges among Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Demonstrating the discourse on happiness as a dramatic interplay between Wisdom and Torah, between philosophy and religion, between reason and faith, Tirosh-Samuelson presents, to specialists and non-specialists alike, a fascinating tour of Jewish intellectual history.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Hebrew Union College and the Dead Sea ScrollsJason KalmanThe bare outline of the story of the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls is well known, but the precise details are sometimes completely forgotten or misconstrued. The recovery of this history in all its complexity is vital for understanding how and why scholarly work on the Scrolls developed as it did over the six decades during which the texts were slowly published. Jason Kalman recovers the fascinating story of Hebrew Union College’s involvement with the Dead Sea Scrolls from their discovery in 1948 until the early 1990s when they were first made accessible to all scholars and to the public.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Ideals Face RealityEdward FramJewish life in early modern Poland was characterized by an adherence to Jewish law (halakhah) that Polish Jewry had inherited from medieval Franco-German Jewry, and almost all aspects of Jewish activity fell within its purview. Jewish law remained constant throughout the ages in some areas, but in others rabbis were forced to reinterpret it in light of the complexities of contemporary life. Edward Fram shows how the Polish community, at times consciously and at times unconsciously, transformed some of its traditional values until they may have been unrecognizable to Jews from an earlier age.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
In the Illuminated DarkTuvia RuebnerWinner of the 2016 Risa Domb/Porjes Hebrew-English Translation Prize

The poetry of Tuvia Ruebner offers us an exquisite and indispensable voice of the twentieth century. Personal loss and the historical devastation of the Holocaust inform all of his work. Rachel Tzvia Back’s translations are beautifully attuned to the Hebrew originals. This first-ever bilingual edition gives readers in both Hebrew and English access to stunning poetry that insists on shared humanity across all border lines and divides.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication

Listen to the poem "Testimony" from this collection, as read by Rachel Tzvia Back on a Hebrew radio program which aired in June, 2014. The English language reading begins at 14:35 of the program.
In the Service of the KingNili Sacher FoxTitles have always been conferred on persons both to identify their functions in society and to assign honorary status. Function-related and honorary titles were so valued that officials and functionaries of varying stations collected the titles accrued in their lifetime and preserved them in a titulary, the ancient equivalent of a resume. Nili Fox analyzes the titles and roles of civil officials and functionaries in Israel and Judah in their ancient Near Eastern context and argues that foreign influence on Israelite state formation is not as clear as it once seemed.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
In the Service of the KingNili Sacher FoxTitles have always been conferred on persons both to identify their functions in society and to assign honorary status. Function-related and honorary titles were so valued that officials and functionaries of varying stations collected the titles accrued in their lifetime and preserved them in a titulary, the ancient equivalent of a resume. Nili Fox analyzes the titles and roles of civil officials and functionaries in Israel and Judah in their ancient Near Eastern context and argues that foreign influence on Israelite state formation is not as clear as it once seemed.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
IndebtedYonatan SagivThis is the first book to examine the oeuvre of Shmuel Yosef Agnon, 1966 Nobel laureate in literature, through a reading that combines perspectives from economic theory, semiotics, psychoanalysis, narrative theory, and Jewish and religious studies.

Kindle eBook Available

Nook eBook Available
Jew in the Medieval WorldJacob Rader MarcusTo gain an accurate view of medieval Judaism, one must look through the eyes of Jews and their contemporaries. First published in 1938, Jacob Rader Marcus’s classic source book on medieval Judaism provides the documents and historical narratives which let the actors and witnesses of events speak for themselves. The 137 sources included in the anthology include historical narratives, codes, legal opinions, martyrologies, memoirs, polemics, epitaphs, advertisements, folk-tales, ethical and pedagogical writings, book prefaces and colophons, commentaries, and communal statutes.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Jewish Culture in Early Modern EuropeRichard CohenThirty-one leading scholars both within and beyond Jewish studies advance, refine, and challenge how we understand the Jewish early modern period. The collection includes a comprehensive range of topics, beginning by examining authority structures of Jewish communities following the expulsions and migrations that reshaped the geographical contours of the Jewish world. The formation of Jewish communities, communal autonomy, and cultural representations of leadership are explored, pointing to a geographical remapping of a Jewish early modernity that can contribute to a better understanding of the integrated economic and cultural landscape of the time.
Jewish Law in TransitionHillel GamoranThe prohibition against lending on interest (Exodus 22:24) was intended to prevent the wealthy from exploiting the unfortunate. In the course of time, it was seen to have consequences that militated against the economic welfare of Jewish society as a whole. As a result, Jewish law (halakhah) has over the centuries relaxed the biblical injunction, allowing interest charges despite the biblical prohibition. Hillel Gamoran seeks to explain how rabbis, from the Tannaim until the present day, have struggled with the law and with one another and used inventive interpretation to create the legal fictions necessary for business life to flourish.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Jewish Law in TransitionHillel GamoranThe prohibition against lending on interest (Exodus 22:24) was intended to prevent the wealthy from exploiting the unfortunate. In the course of time, it was seen to have consequences that militated against the economic welfare of Jewish society as a whole. As a result, Jewish law (halakhah) has over the centuries relaxed the biblical injunction, allowing interest charges despite the biblical prohibition. Hillel Gamoran seeks to explain how rabbis, from the Tannaim until the present day, have struggled with the law and with one another and used inventive interpretation to create the legal fictions necessary for business life to flourish.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Jewish Lore in Manichaean CosmogonyJohn ReevesA work entitled the "Book of Giants" figures in every list of the Manichaean canon preserved from antiquity. Both the nature of this work and the intellectual baggage of the third-century Persian prophet to whom it is ascribed remained unknown to scholars until 1943. Discovery of a fragmentary Aramaic version at Qumran enables John C. Reeves to connect the dots and demonstrate that the motifs of Jewish Enochic literature, in particular those of the story of the Watchers and Giants, form the skeletal structure of Mani's cosmological teachings, and that Chapters 1 to 11 of Genesis fertilized Near Eastern thought, even to the borders of India and China.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Jewish Lore in Manichaean CosmogonyJohn ReevesA work entitled the "Book of Giants" figures in every list of the Manichaean canon preserved from antiquity. Both the nature of this work and the intellectual baggage of the third-century Persian prophet to whom it is ascribed remained unknown to scholars until 1943. Discovery of a fragmentary Aramaic version at Qumran enables John C. Reeves to connect the dots and demonstrate that the motifs of Jewish Enochic literature, in particular those of the story of the Watchers and Giants, form the skeletal structure of Mani's cosmological teachings, and that Chapters 1 to 11 of Genesis fertilized Near Eastern thought, even to the borders of India and China.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Jews in Christian EuropeJacob Rader MarcusFirst published in 1938, Jacob Rader Marcus’s The Jews in The Medieval World has remained an indispensable resource for its comprehensive view of Jewish historical experience from late antiquity through the early modern period, viewed through primary source documents in English translation.

In this new work, Marc Saperstein has recast the volume’s focus, now fully centered on Christian Europe, updated the work’s organizational format, and added seventy-two new annotated sources. In his compelling introduction, Saperstein supplies a modern and thought-provoking discussion of the changing values that influence our understanding of history, analyzing issues surrounding periodization, organization, and inclusion.

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Nook eBook Available
Jews in European HistoryWolfgang BeckInternationally renowned historians from Germany, Israel, and the United States—including  Eberhard Jäckel, Amos Funkenstein, David Sorkin, Michael A. Meyer, Shulamit Volkov, Jehuda Reinharz, and Saul Friedländer—presented these seven lectures to large public audiences at the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich. The series achieved the goal of eliciting the history of this minority as a history in its own right. The Jews in European History, a broad and almost limitless subject, focuses on central European or German Jewish developments, which are only partially typical of those in other European countries. The authors address a wide range of topics, from the interdependence between Judaism and Christianity to the multifaceted efforts towards redirecting and strengthening Jewish identity under the aegis of Zionism.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Karaite Separatism in Nineteenth-Century RussiaPhilip MillerWhen the Karaites successfully dissociated themselves from the Rabbanite Russian Jews with the creation of the Karaite Religious Consistory in 1837, the result was a schism within Judaism unprecedented since the rise of Christianity. Philip E. Miller sets this event in the context of the history of the Russian Karaites from their origins to the present, focusing on economic and political concerns that led to the schism, and provides access to an important primary source document for the study of Karaite history in Hebrew and English translation.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Let Me Continue to Speak the TruthElizabeth LoentzIn 1953, Freud biographer Ernest Jones revealed that the famous hysteric Anna O. was really Bertha Pappenheim (1859-1936), the prolific author, German-Jewish feminist, pioneering social worker, and activist. Loentz directs attention away from the young woman who arguably invented the talking cure and back to Pappenheim and her post-Anna O. achievements, especially her writings, which reveal one of the most versatile, productive, influential, and controversial Jewish thinkers and leaders of her time.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Letter That Has Not Been ReadShaul BarSince Freud, the study of dreams has typically involved inquiry into past and present emotional states. The ancients, unfamiliar with the intricate byways of the human soul revealed by modern psychology, typically saw dreams as channels of communication between human beings and external sources. In this volume, Shaul Bar surveys, classifies, and examines the literary function of dreams in the Hebrew Bible, in comparison to dreams in the ancient Near East and the Talmud.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Letter That Has Not Been ReadShaul BarSince Freud, the study of dreams has typically involved inquiry into past and present emotional states. The ancients, unfamiliar with the intricate byways of the human soul revealed by modern psychology, typically saw dreams as channels of communication between human beings and external sources. In this volume, Shaul Bar surveys, classifies, and examines the literary function of dreams in the Hebrew Bible, in comparison to dreams in the ancient Near East and the Talmud.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Levi's VindicationKenneth StowStow preesnts a critical review of the “1007 Anonymous”, a fictional story of murderous attack and forced conversion known as “The Terrible Event of the Year 1007.” Stow’s historical analysis shows the story to be untrue, thereby vindicating French scholar Israel Levi, who first demonstrated the falsehood of the account, although he was largely ignored.
Loosen the Fetters of Thy Tongue, WomanZafira Lidovsky CohenMaverick Israeli poet Yona Wallach (1944-1985) is often remembered for her outrageous and unconventional personality and the controversies engendered by her sometimes shamelessly erotic verse. But she is regarded by many of her friends and colleagues as the most important among the Israeli poets of her generation, perhaps even the greatest Hebrew poet of modern times, and has had a profound effect on Israel's cultural life ever since her works began to appear in periodicals in the early 1960s. Zafrira Lidovsky Cohen presents the first full-length critical analysis in English of her works.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Memoirs of Nahum N. GlatzerMichael FishbaneThe geographic, spiritual, and intellectual journeys of Nahum N. Glatzer (1903-1990)—prolific scholar, Brandeis University professor, and editor of the Schocken publishing house—reveal a rich cultural ambiance that no longer exists, as well as a breadth of perspective and learning that remains enviable in our time. Michael Fishbane’s detailed introduction sets these 78 memoir entries from the final decades of Glatzer’s life in the context of his life and work. A preface by Judith Glatzer Wechsler offers personal reflections on the character of her father and his work.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Merit of Our MothersTracy Guren KlirsWhile they may not have been able to help constitute a minyan, and while many did not know Hebrew or Aramaic, women produced and used material for prayer at home. These moving supplications (tkhines) in the Yiddish original and English translation reflect the most personal spiritual concerns of premodern Ashkenazic women. They are of great appeal and value to those who wish to hear the voices of Jewish women in history, study Yiddish literature and culture, or create new expressions of spirituality.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Modern Jewish MythologiesGlenda AbramsonBased on the Mason Lectures delivered at the Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies in the winter of 1995, the ten essays in this volume demonstrate the function and dynamic effect of Jewish mythologies in social, political, and psychological life. Essays treat topics including the Golem, the male superhero in Zionist myth, feminist treatments of Sarah, the role of the chevrah kaddisha, Kafka’s animal fables, and the role of myth in Jewish remembrance.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
My Dear DaughterEdward FramTo teach observance of the three women's commandments—the laws of challah, Sabbath candles, and menstrual separation—in a systematic and impersonal manner, Rabbi Benjamin Slonik (ca. 1550-1620) harnessed the relatively new technology of printing and published a how-to pamphlet for women in the Yiddish vernacular. Fram transcribes, translates, and analyzes Slonik's pamphlet and presents a treasure trove of information about the place and roles of women in late sixteenth-century Polish-Jewish society.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
My Dear DaughterEdward FramTo teach observance of the three women's commandments—the laws of challah, Sabbath candles, and menstrual separation—in a systematic and impersonal manner, Rabbi Benjamin Slonik (ca. 1550-1620) harnessed the relatively new technology of printing and published a how-to pamphlet for women in the Yiddish vernacular. Fram transcribes, translates, and analyzes Slonik's pamphlet and presents a treasure trove of information about the place and roles of women in late sixteenth-century Polish-Jewish society.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Nelson GlueckJonathan BrownNelson Glueck, affectionately called Ha-Professor ("The Professor"), was born in 1900 to a struggling immigrant Jewish family in Cincinnati. By 1950, he had become an archaeologist, a personal friend to many members of the political and intellectual scene in the nascent state of Israel, and president of Hebrew Union College. He instilled in students and readers alike a deep love for the ancient Land of Israel and made lasting contributions to the growth and future of Reform Judaism.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
New TraditionGershon Shaked The Jewish struggle for survival as a spiritual entity after the cohesiveness of Jewish communal life began to disintegrate in the latter decades of the nineteenth century spawned a new tradition---a modern secular Hebraic cultural tradition. These seventeen essays by Israel's late esteemed literary critic, Gershon Shaked (1929-2006), explore the evolution of that new tradition, tracing its major processes and identifying central stages in the development of new canonical texts.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
No Way OutEmanuel MelzerEmanuel Melzer demonstrates that the politics of Polish Jewry concerning questions of policy and the tenacious daily struggles against discrimination had little effect upon their deteriorating situation. Without charismatic leadership and an organizational framework based on common Jewish destiny and mutual identification, its ability to confront the grave challenges that lay ahead was seriously impaired. With the approach of war, many felt they were trapped with no way out, left to face the Nazi onslaught virtually alone.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
No Way OutEmanuel MelzerEmanuel Melzer demonstrates that the politics of Polish Jewry concerning questions of policy and the tenacious daily struggles against discrimination had little effect upon their deteriorating situation. Without charismatic leadership and an organizational framework based on common Jewish destiny and mutual identification, its ability to confront the grave challenges that lay ahead was seriously impaired. With the approach of war, many felt they were trapped with no way out, left to face the Nazi onslaught virtually alone.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
On the Surface of Silence Lea GoldbergThe first English language translation of the final poetry collection of Lea Goldberg, a preeminent and central poet of modern Hebrew poetry.
Profane ScripturesRuth Kartun-BlumProfane Scriptures, based on the Gustave A. and Mamie W. Efroymson Memorial Lectures (1995), illuminates the new midrashic method in modern Hebrew poetry that seeks to neutralize the Bible’s sway over modern Israeli life.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Profane ScripturesRuth Kartun-BlumProfane Scriptures, based on the Gustave A. and Mamie W. Efroymson Memorial Lectures (1995), illuminates the new midrashic method in modern Hebrew poetry that seeks to neutralize the Bible’s sway over modern Israeli life.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Reason and HopeEva JospeThe 19th century neo-Kantian philosopher Hermann Cohen has provided significant underpinnings for understanding Judaism as a religion with a rational and universal character, as a religion of hope for the future. Eva Jospe translates, introduces, and presents commentary on eight selected essays that constitute an introduction to Cohen’s thought. This reprint edition comes more than twenty years after the book’s first publication and remains a valued resource for introducing scholars, students, and lay readers alike to the work of this important Jewish thinker.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Remember Amalek!Louis FeldmanThe divine command to exterminate Amalek is what in contemporary terms has been called genocide. Louis Feldman sets this command in the context of other biblical instances of genocide, whether by divine command or not, and explores how Hellenistic and Rabbinic commentators on the Bible wrestled with the issues involved in this divine command, especially its provision that an entire people must be eternally punished for the misdeeds of their ancestors. His study exposes the deep roots of biblical reception in contemporary political and moral issues.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Remnant StonesAviva Ben-UrIn the 1660s, Jews of Iberian ancestry, many of them fleeing Inquisitorial persecution, established an agrarian settlement in the midst of the Surinamese tropics. The heart of this community—Jodensavanne, or Jews' Savannah—became an autonomous village with its own Jewish institutions. Remnant Stones: Essays offers a historical and cultural overview of this community, with special emphasis on its synagogues and the Jewish and Creole cemeteries. It complements Remnant Stones: The Jewish Cemeteries of Suriname: Epitaphs, which presents transcriptions, English translations, annotations, and selected photographs of nearly 1,700 gravestones, accompanied by scaled plans of the cemeteries.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Remnant StonesAviva Ben-UrIn the 1660s, Jews of Iberian ancestry, many of them fleeing Inquisitorial persecution, established an agrarian settlement in the midst of the Surinamese tropics. The heart of this community—Jodensavanne, or Jews' Savannah—became an autonomous village with its own Jewish institutions. Remnant Stones: Epitaphs presents transcriptions and English translations of nearly 1,700 epitaphs, carved in Portugese, Hebrew, Spanish, Dutch, Aramaic, and French.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Self-Portrait of a Holocaust SurvivorWerner WeinbergWerner Weinberg’s scholarship was prodigious, yielding monographs on ancient Hebrew epigraphy and biblical exegesis; the syntax of Rabbinic Hebrew; medieval grammars; and numerous studies on various aspects of Modern Hebrew. Both Weinberg and his wife Lisl survived internment at the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp. These essays convey Weinberg’s ongoing struggle to put into words something that might offer understanding to post-Holocaust generations. But they’re also about a survivor’s own desire for meaning and sense in a senseless world.
Sifra, Dibbura de SinaiHoward ApothakerHoward Apothaker’s analysis of the exegetical and rhetorical characteristics of Sifra builds on his translation of and commentary on the section of Dibbura de Sinai which covers Leviticus 25–27. Analysis of Sifra’s highly formalized rhetoric yields insight concerning the general purpose(s) for which the framers created the work, showing that the framers of Sifra sought as their main objective to validate the essentiality, or non-superfluity, of every word of Scripture.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
SisterhoodCarole BalinWomen of Reform Judaism marks its centennial anniversary with this collection of new scholarly essays which looks back at its history in order to understand how the hopes and dreams of its founders have come to fruition. Essays consider Women of Reform Judaism’s religious activities, contributions to American Jewish culture, programs and projects, and role as an agent of change. Sisterhood fills a void in the study of women’s philanthropic organizations, as no sustained attention has heretofore been paid to the contributions of women to the American synagogue.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Spectacular DifferenceZelda Schneurson MishkovskyFilled with vivid, often dreamlike pictures from the natural world, the poems of Zelda Schneurson Mishkovsky, known to her Hebrew readers simply as Zelda, are unlike anything else in Hebrew literature. Marcia Falk was authorized by the poet to be her translator and worked on these translations over the course of three decades. Selected from all six of Zelda's books, the poems are accompanied by the translator's essay introducing the poet and illuminating the highly personal and often startling images in her lyrics.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Storm in the CommunityJozeph MichmanInspired by the expanded freedom of the press and the satirical and often vulgar Spectatorial writings which were popular at the time, a small but energetic group of enlightened Jews in Amsterdam decided to publish a series of Yiddish polemical pamphlets (Diskursn) as an informative and propagandistic vehicle through which they could anonymously persuade the Jews of Amsterdam to choose the party of progress and enlightenment. This first-ever bilingual edition helps the reader understand and appreciate these colorful Dutch Jews and their often impassioned arguments.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Theology and PoetryJakob PetuchowskiThe traditional Jewish liturgy contains not only the standard prayers ordained in the Talmud and the ritual codes, but also poetic embellishments (piyyutim) of all kinds. These poems often present unconventional and idiosyncratic theological ideas on the same prayerbook page with conventional theology. Jakob Petuchowski presents ten piyyutim in pointed Hebrew, with translation, commentary, and introduction to the theological theme of each poem. The volume is an indispensible introduction to medieval liturgical poetry for all students of Jewish thought and culture.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
To Reveal Our HeartsCarole BalinCarole Balin introduces us to dozens of Jewish women writers from late nineteenth- and early twentieth- century Tsarist Russia, focusing on five who were among the most prolific. Their extant literary remains include not only fiction, poetry, drama, translations, and essays, but also memoirs, autobiographies, diaries, and letters. The life-like and touching portraits that emerge of these talented writers allow us a penetrating view of Jewish women within their Russian-Jewish milieu that is far more nuanced than the images of balabuste (housewife) and revolutionary currently held in collective Jewish memory.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
To Worship God ProperlyRuth LangerA major influence on the development of rabbinic liturgical custom after the destruction of the Temple was the need to establish that this innovative worship of the heart was as acceptable to God as biblically prescribed sacrificial worship. Later Jewish communities and their leaders continually refined the details of the system they inherited to reflect their changing understandings of acceptable, meaningful, and constructive worship. Ruth Langer uses the tools of historical scholarship and anthropological study of ritual to analyze some of the dynamics that have shaped Jewish liturgical law and determined the broader outlines of the prayer life of the Jews.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
To Write the Lips of SleepersWarren BargadIn 1937, the young Yiddish poet Berl Feldman bade farewell to his family in Radzivil and emigrated to the land of Israel, where he became the Hebrew poet Amir Gilboa. In this comprehensive study, Warren Bargad describes and interprets Gilboa's works at the various stages of his career and defines his place in the tradition of modern Hebrew poetry. Spanning nearly fifty years and collected in eight volumes, his works reflect the multiplicity of norms that dominated Israeli poetry in the thirties and forties as well as the personal artistic vicissitudes that moved Gilboa from one set of poetics to another in the course of his life's work.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
To Write the Lips of SleepersWarren BargadIn 1937, the young Yiddish poet Berl Feldman bade farewell to his family in Radzivil and emigrated to the land of Israel, where he became the Hebrew poet Amir Gilboa. In this comprehensive study, Warren Bargad describes and interprets Gilboa's works at the various stages of his career and defines his place in the tradition of modern Hebrew poetry. Spanning nearly fifty years and collected in eight volumes, his works reflect the multiplicity of norms that dominated Israeli poetry in the thirties and forties as well as the personal artistic vicissitudes that moved Gilboa from one set of poetics to another in the course of his life's work.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Were Our Mouths Filled With SongEric FriedlandSince the period in which the Jewish liturgy was standardized, there has hardly been a time when it was not somehow in a state of flux. Eric L. Friedland explores the countless ways that the Siddur, Mahzor, and Haggadah have been adjusted, amplified, or transformed so as to faithfully mirror modern Jews' understanding of themselves, their place in society, and their sancta. In the tradition of liturgologists such as Elbogen, Idelsohn, and Petuchowski, Friedland focuses on latter-day adaptations of the prayerbook, giving proper recognition to the recent concern for intellectual integrity, cultural congruity, group and individual self-redefinition, and honest speech in Jewish prayer.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Were Our Mouths Filled With SongEric FriedlandSince the period in which the Jewish liturgy was standardized, there has hardly been a time when it was not somehow in a state of flux. Eric L. Friedland explores the countless ways that the Siddur, Mahzor, and Haggadah have been adjusted, amplified, or transformed so as to faithfully mirror modern Jews' understanding of themselves, their place in society, and their sancta. In the tradition of liturgologists such as Elbogen, Idelsohn, and Petuchowski, Friedland focuses on latter-day adaptations of the prayerbook, giving proper recognition to the recent concern for intellectual integrity, cultural congruity, group and individual self-redefinition, and honest speech in Jewish prayer.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Window on Their WorldEdward FramFrom a manuscript that was lost for more than half a century comes new information about one of the greatest Jewish communities of all time. The court diaries of Rabbi Hayyim Gundersheim (d. 1795), a member of the rabbinic court of late eighteenth-century Frankfurt, sheds light on daily life in the Judengasse ("Jewish lane"). Edward Fram’s transcription gives readers access to this source, along with pertinent documents from Frankfurt’s community record book, important for the study of European Jewry on the eve of the Enlightenment.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Women RabbisGary ZolaThis collection of essays, written by distinguished rabbis and scholars, seeks to examine the significance of women in the modern rabbinate. The essays address the history of women’s journey to ordination; how the existence of women rabbis changed and challenged Reform Judaism; the impact this transformation of the rabbinate had on liturgy and theology, Jewish identity, and Jewish communal leadership; and how women rabbis might affect the future of the rabbinate, congregational life, and Jewish communal life in the twenty-first century.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Yannai on GenesisLaura LieberPiyyut is the art of Hebrew or Aramaic poetry composed either in place of or as adornments to Jewish statutory prayers. Laura S. Lieber uses the piyyutim of a single poet, Yannai (ca. sixth century C.E.), to introduce readers to this important but largely unfamiliar body of writings. Her groundbreaking study is an invitation to those with interests in areas such as liturgical studies, rabbinic literature and targum studies, the early synagogue and its art, Byzantine Christian culture and society, and the history of biblical interpretation to engage with these beautiful and neglected texts and include them in larger intellectual conversations.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication
Your Voice Like a Ram's HornMarc SapersteinThe eighteen studies in this book continue the exploration of the Jewish sermon Saperstein began in his groundbreaking Jewish Preaching 1200-1800. His new research further illustrates the importance of this genre, largely ignored by modern scholarship, as an indispensible resource for understanding Jewish history, spirituality, and thought from the High Middle Ages to the beginning of the Emancipation in Europe.

A Hebrew Union College Press publication

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