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By Subject - Political Science/US
TitleAuthorDescription
Ambition and DivisionSteven SchierA comprehensive overview of the Bush presidency, including his final year in office, measuring the trajectory of his aspirations, accomplishments, and failures. Reviews the historical position of the Bush administration, and defines and analyzes its long-term political goals. Places specific administration actions—from tax cuts to the Iraq War in strategic and historical context.

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American ImpasseMichael MinkenbergFor forty years, the political energies of the United States were absorbed by the American-Soviet rivalry. These contributors argue that, with the demise of communism, American politics and policy met the challenge of the new global order with alarming slowness and inflexibility. These essays provide an analytic and rather unflattering snapshot of U.S. foreign policy at a time of rapid change.

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Arms for the HornJeffrey LefebvreThrough massive documentation and extensive interviewing, Jeffrey A. Lefebvre explains what price the United States has paid for its relations with two weak and vulnerable arms recipients in the Horn of Africa.

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Between the BranchesKenneth CollierBecause of the power-fearing drafters of the U.S. Constitution, presidents have had to look beyond the formal powers of the office to influence Congress and push a legislative agenda. In Between the Branches, a book of unprecedented depth, Kenneth Collier traces the evolution of the methods the White House has developed to influence Congress over nine adminstrations, from Eisenhower to Clinton.

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By Invitation OnlySteven SchierSteven Schier examines the shift in U.S. politics to activation—the political variant of niche marketing. This method encourages only a strategically selected few to get involved, resulting in a decline of majority rule in American politics.

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Charter School LandscapeSandra VergariSandra Vergari has brought together the work of experts to create the first book to analyze and compare the charter school reform across a broad range of jurisdictions. Individual chapters discuss areas in the United States and Canada.

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Competitive CityMark SchneiderThe Competitive City analyzes the effect of competition among suburban communities to attract residents and businesses with better public services and lower taxes. This timely book won a special citation from the American Political Science Association's Urban Affairs Section for its "major theoretical development."

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Competitive Interference and Twentieth Century DiplomacyRichard CottamCottam defines a foreign policy he calls competitive interference, which invokes counter-insurgency, political, economic, and psychological manipulations, and looks deeply into the internal affairs of other countries, often secretly. He explores the United States' institutional adjustment to it, and provides a framework for projection and evaluation of foreign policy in this arena.

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Congress and Economic Policy MakingDarrell WestThis book examines congressional decision making on economic policy during the Reagan administration.

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Congress Oversees the BureaucracyMorris OgulCongressional supervision of the way the executive implements legislative mandates-“oversight” of the bureaucracy-is one of the most complex and least understood functions of Congress. In this book, Morris Ogul clarifies the meaning of oversight and analyzes the elements that contribute to its success or neglect.

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Critical Masses and Critical Choices Kerry Herron Examines American attitudes on issues of national and international security. Based on over 13,000 in-depth interviews conducted over a ten-year period. Provides surprising insights into public opinion on nuclear deterrence, terrorism, and other security issues.

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Debt WishAlberta SbragiaAlbert Sbragia considers American urban government as an investor whether for building infrastructure or supporting economic development. Over time, such investment has become disconnected from the normal political and administrative processes of local policymaking through the use of special public spending authorities like water and sewer commissions and port, turnpike, and public power authorities.

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Demographic Change and the American FutureR. FoslerThe essays in this volume analyze the growing stresses of demographic trends in the United States and their implications for policymakers.

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Enduring Controversies in Presidential Nominating PoliticsEmmett Jr. BuellRetraces the more than 200-year history of presidential elections in the US—a spectacle that never fails to engage, excite, and enrage millions of Americans—showing the evolution from the days of the founders to today.

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Framing American Politics Karen CallaghanUsing current controversial issues, the contributors to this collection dicuss the importance of how a concept is framed. They explore the process of framing as well as the effects it can have on the public's political awareness.

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Heir to EmpireCarl ParriniParrini examines the evolution of United States economic diplomacy during a critical period in world history—after World War I.

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High Risk and Big AmbitionSteven SchierAssesses the trajectory and character of Bush’s time in office--a presidency best characterized by a series of bold risks in the service of two primary goals: the transformation of American foreign policy and the creation of a lasting Republican dominance of domestic politics.
Higher Civil Service in the United StatesMark HuddlestonA Choice Outstanding Academic Book 1995

Hudleston and Boyer examine U.S. efforts to develop higher civil service, beginning with the Eisenhower administration and culminating in the passage of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978. Arguing that the U.S. system simply hasn't worked, they view why reform efforts have failed, and offer recommendations for the future.

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Hitting First William Keller A critical analysis of the political dialogue leading up to the embrace of preventive war as national policy and rationale for the invasion and occupation of Iraq. Offers a framework for avoiding future policy breakdowns through deliberative public and governmental debate.

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Homeward BoundGlenn ParkerStudying the travel behavior of senators and representatives between 1959 and 1980, Glenn Parker examines the increased attention paid to home constituents, and the political benefits of this action. He situates his findings in historical context, to understand the many dynamics of the legislator-constituent exchange.

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Horses in MidstreamAndrew BuschHorses in Midstream breaks the mold of midterm election literature by focusing on the consequences of midterm elections rather than on the causes of the anti-administration pattern of those elections. The book concludes that the midterm pattern has two primary consequences: it stymies the President and provides an opportunity for the revitalization of the opposition party—and that numerical losses by the President's party is really only a small part of the equation. Consequently, midterm elections can be considered an additional check in the U.S. political system, acting as a mechanism that helps to assure rough two party balance.

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How Does Social Science Work? Paul DiesingPaul Diesing takes an innovative, sometimes iconoclastic look at social scientists at work in many disciplines.

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Interests and InstitutionsRobert SalisburyInterest and Institutions is a collection of essays written by distinguished political scientist Robert Salsibury, a leading analyst of interest group politics. He offers his theories on the workings and influence of groups, organizations, and individuals in many different areas of American politics.

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Making Regulatory PolicyKeith HawkinsFew scholars have applied modern behavioral and organization theory to study U.S. regulatory agencies, and fewer still have integrated this approach with frameworks drawn from administrative law and analysis. This multidisciplinary collection combines detailed case studies with theoretical discussions drawing upon legal concepts, organizational analysis, and behavioral theory.

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Managing National Security PolicyWilliam NewmannWilliam Newmann examines the ways in which presidents make national security decisions, and explores how those processes evolve over time. He creates a complex portrait of policy making, which may help future presidents design national security decision structures that fit the realities of the office in today's world.

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Managing the PresidencyColin CampbellWinner of the Richard Neustadt Award of the American Political Science Association

Campbell focuses on the institutional development of the presidency, and its advisers and staff, and assesses the Carter and Regan administrations within historical context.

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Moderation DilemmaAnya BernsteinAnya Bernstein offers a unique perspective on one of the few major policy innovations of the 1990s, and on the contentious issue of the role of the state in legislating family and medical leaves in the United States.

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National Elections and the Autonomy of American State Party SystemsJames GimpelTraditional theories of party organization have emphasized two-party electoral competition as the force behind party unity in state politics. V. O. Key first advanced this theory in Southern Politics, where he concluded that party factionalism in the South was mainly attributable to the one-party character of the region. But this traditional theory does not fit all states equally well. In the states of the West, especially, parties are competitive, but political activity is centered on candidates, not parties. The theory of candidate-centered politics allows Gimpel to explain why party factionalism has persisted in many regions of the United States in spite of fierce two-party competition. Using interviews, polling data, elections returns, and demographic information, Gimpel contends that major upheavals in the two-party balance of presidential voting may leave lower offices untouched.

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Native Americans and Public PolicyFremont LydenNative Americans, who are recognized simultaneously as sovereign tribal groups and as American citizens, present American society and its policy-making process with a problem fundamentally different from that posed by other ethnic minorities. In these essays, the contributors discuss the historical background, certain pathologies of Indian-white relations, questions of legal sovereignty and economic development, and efforts to find new ways of successfully resolving recent controversies.

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Party Organizations in American PoliticsCornelius CotterContradicting the conventional political wisdom of the 1970s, which said state political parties were dormant and verging upon extinction, this book reveals that state party organizations actually grew stronger in the 1960s and 1970s.

Reprinted with a new preface that covers changes in the 1980s in electoral politics, Party Organizations in American Politics encourages a reappraisal of scholarly treatment of party organization in political science.

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Political Failure of Employment Policy, 1945–1982Gary MucciaroniThis book follows the impact of economic ideas and opinions on federal employment policy from the 1946 Employment Act to the Job Training Partnership Act of 1982. Among many factors, Mucciaroni traces policy failures to the fact that labor and management were not centrally involved in making policy, and employment programs lacked a stable and organized constituency committed to their success. Additionally, employment programs were not integrated with economic policy, were hampered by conflicting objectives, and were difficult to carry out effectively.

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Politics of Public Utility RegulationWilliam Gormley Jr.This book focuses on the important and increasingly controversial issues of utility regulation by combining a sophisticated understanding of these issues with a rigorous examination of various regulatory arrangements in the United States. Gormley makes specific proposals for regulatory reform and emphasizes the importance (and difficulty) of assuring both expertise and accountability.

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Politics of the U.S. CabinetJeffrey CohenJeffrey E. Cohen presents a detailed, quantitative study of the characteristics of presidential cabinets from the days of George Washington through the first Reagan administration.

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Postmodern PresidencySteven SchierIncluding the conflict in Kosovo, the WTO meeting in Seattle, and new developments in the 2000 presidential campaign, The Postmodern Presidency is the most comprehensive and current assessment of Bill Clinton’s presidency available in print.

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Post-Passage PoliticsStephen Van Beek“Megabills” that package scores of legislative proposals into House and Senate bills generate unprecedented disagreements between the House and Senate, requiring congressional leaders, the president, committee chairs, and junior members to play new roles in this struggle for resolution.

Conference committees of hundreds of members, informal negotiations among party leaders, and preconference strategizing and behavior are among the new realities of bicameralism that are viewed in this study. These conferences are vital because they generally are the last arenas in which large-scale changes can be made in legislation.

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Presidency and Public Policy MakingGeorge Edwards IIIThe premise behind this book is that policy making provides a useful perspective for studying the presidency, perhaps the most important and least understood policy-making institution in the United States. The eleven essays focus on diverse aspects of presidential policy making, providing insights on the presidency and its relationship to other policy-making actors and institutions.

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President’s CallJudith MichaelsJudith Michaels provides an in-depth examination of the Senate-confirmed presidential appointees of the Gorge H. W. Bush administration, and analyzes what these choices reveal about him, his administration, and the institution of political appointments itself. She compares this research to other administrations in the modern era. Particularly fascinating is how Bush's appointees compare with those of Ronald Reagan.

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Promise and Paradox of Civil Service ReformPatricia IngrahamFourteen essays examine, through a public policy focus, the 1978 civil service reform and its aftermath.

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Public Spirit in the Thrift TragedyMark Carl RomIn this award-winning analysis, Rom examines the political causes of the “thrift tragedy” during the 1980s when the FSFIC failed spectacularly, and cost taxpayers an estimated $200 billion.

Winner of the Harold Lasswell Award of the American Political Science Association

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Regulation in the Reagan-Bush EraBarry FriedmanNew in Paper.

Explores the unprecedented influence of executive power over the federal regulatory process during the Ronald Regan and then George H. W. Bush presidencies.

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Reluctant PartnersRobert StokerConstitutional principles divide authority between market and state and within the structure of the state itself. This diffusion of authority is valuable because it defends against the excesses of national government, causing federal policy initiatives to be more attuned to local jurisdictions, and creating a context in which free enterprise may flourish. However, this diffusion of authority weakens the control that federal officials enjoy over resources vital to the implementation of national policy. Reluctant Partners explores these problems and proposes strategies to reduce the impediments to cooperation and promote policy coordination. Drawing upon theories of regime development and cooperation, Stoker suggests the “implementation regime framework” to analyze the difficulties of realizing cooperation in the implementation process.

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Researching the PresidencyGeorge Edwards IIIThis collection views the recruitment and selection of presidential candidates, presidential personality, advisory networks, policy making, evaluations of presidents, and comparative analysis of chief executives. Additionally, specialists in cognitive psychology, formal theory, organization theory, leadership theory, institutionalism, and methodology, apply their expertise to the analysis of the presidentcy to generate innovative approaches to presidential research.

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SEC and Capital Market RegulationAnne KhademianKhademian examines the significance of the SEC for securities policy and uses the agency as a model for the study of bureaucracy and bureaucratic theory.

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State Roots of National PoliticsMichael BerkmanExplores the role of state politics in shaping the national agenda during the 1980s. By focusing on the federal tax policy from 1978-1986, Berkman argues that a conservative political agenda slowly replaced the liberal agenda dominant since World War II.

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Strategic DisagreementJohn GilmourAlthough compromise is an inherent part of politics, many politicians chose not to adjust their goals for fear of losing supporters or a strong debate position. It is the strategies of these office holders that John Gilmour describes in Strategic Disagreement, illuminating lost opportunities to pass important legislation resulting from such disagreements.

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Struggle for Social Security, 1900–1935Roy LuboveAn examination of the early years of the social security movement, and the clash of traditional American ethics of individual responsiblity with Progressive Era social reforms.

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Two-Way StreetGeorge KrauseRelying on advanced statistical techniques and case studies, George Krause argues for a dynamic system of influence. His analysis and conclusions will challenge conventional theoretical and empirical wisdom in the field of administrative politics and public bureaucracy.

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U.S. Experiment in Social MedicineAlice SardellThe first political history of the Community Health Center Program, the only federal experiment in social medicine. Sardell views the inherent political struggles, and the survival of the program on the condition that it only serve the poor.

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U.S. Foreign Policy after the Cold WarRandall RipleyThis volume explores the revisions to a variety of U.S. bureaucratic institutions and policy areas in the wake of the political upheaval following the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991.

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United States Oil Policy, 1890-1964Gerald NashFocusing on the oil industry over a seventy-five year period, Nash provides a study of government–private industry relations, that sheds light on how America’s industries are regulated by the laws of supply, demand, and defense considerations.

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