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By Subject - Latin America/History
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“I Sweat the Flavor of Tin”Robert SmaleA study of the rise of Bolivian tin miners into a politically active labor movement during the early twentieth century, and their eventual challenge to the oligarchy controlling the nation.

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“They Eat from Their Labor”Ann ZulawskiA study of the growth of the indigenous labor force in upper Peru (now Bolivia) during colonial times. Zulawski provides case studies in mining and agriculture, and places her data within a larger historical context than analyzes Iberian and Andean concepts of gender, property, and labor.

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Acting IncaE. Gabrielle KuenzliIn this groundbreaking study, E. Gabrielle Kuenzli revisits the events of the Bolivian civil war and its aftermath during the early twentieth-century, to dispel popular myths about the Aymara and reveal their forgotten role in the nation-building project of modern Bolivia.
Agrarian RepublicAldo Lauria-SantiagoWith unprecedented use of local and national sources, Lauria-Santiago presents a more complex portrait of El Salvador than has ever been ventured before. Using thoroughly researched regional case studies, Lauria-Santiago challenges the accepted vision of Central America in the nineteenth century and critiques the "liberal oligarchic hegemony" model of El Salvador. He reveals the existence of a diverse, commercially active peasantry that was deeply involved with local and national networks of power.

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Archives of Cuba/Los archivos de CubaLouis PérezThis is an invaluable comprehensive guide to the archival holdings and manuscript collections located in depositories throughout Cuba.

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Argentine WorkersPeter RanisAn insightful analysis of the complex combination of values and attitudes exhibited by Argentine workers in a heavily unionized, industrially developing country, while also ascertaining their political beliefs.

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Army Politics in Cuba, 1898-1958Louis Perez Jr.Pérez follows the rise and fall of the Cuban army, and its increasing political influence, from the Spanish American War until Castro’s revolutionary takeover in 1958.

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Bound LivesRachel Sarah O'TooleBound Lives chronicles the lived experience of race relations in northern coastal Peru during the colonial era. Rachel Sarah O’Toole examines how Andeans and Africans negotiated and employed casta, and in doing so, constructed these racial categories. This study highlights the tenuous interactions of colonial authorities, indigenous communities, and enslaved populations and shows how the interplay between colonial law and daily practice shaped the nature of colonialism and slavery.

Winner of the 2013 Perú Flora Tristán Prize from the Peru Section of the Latin American Studies Association

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Bread, or Bullets!Joan CasanovasThe first thoroughly documented history of organized labor in nineteenth-century Cuba, this work focuses on how urban laborers joined together in collective action during the transition from slave to free labor and in the last decades of Spanish colonial rule in Cuba.

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City at the Center of the WorldErnesto CapelloIn this original cultural history, Ernesto Capello analyzes the formation of memory, myth, and modernity through the eyes of Quito’s diverse populations. By employing Mikhail Bakhtin’s concept of chronotopes, Capello views the configuration of time and space in narratives that defined Quito’s identity and its place in the world. To Capello, these tropes began to crystallize at the end of the nineteenth century, serving as a tool for distinct groups who laid claim to history for economic or political gain during the upheavals of modernism.

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Coffee FrontierDouglas YarringtonA pioneering book on peasant studies, export-led development, the relationship of state and society, and the consolidation of nation-states in Latin America.

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Conquering NatureSergio Díaz-BriquetsConquering Nature, the only book-length analysis of the environmental situation in Cuba after four decades of socialist rule, is based on extensive examination of secondary sources and informed by the study of development and environmental trends in former socialist countries as well as in the developing world.

Winner of the 2002 Warren Dean Memorial Award from Environmentl History of Latin America.

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Conquest of HistoryChristopher Schmidt-NowaraBy exploring controversies such as the veracity of the Black Legend, the location of Christopher Columbus’s mortal remains, and the survival of indigenous cultures, this study shows how recorded history became implicated in the struggles over empire.

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Cuba between Empires, 1878–1902Louis Pérez, Jr.In an unusually powerful book that will appeal to the general reader as well as to the specialist, Louis A. Perez, Jr., recounts the story of the critical years when Cuba won its independence from Spain only to fall in the American orbit.

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Cuba under the Platt Amendment, 1902–1934Louis Pérez, Jr.Pérez shows how U.S. armed intervention in Cuba in 1898 and subsequent military occupation revitalized elements of the colonial system that would serve U.S. imperialist interests during Cuba’s independence.

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Dignifying ArgentinaEduardo ElenaDuring their term, Juan and Eva Perón (1946–1955) led the region’s largest populist movement in pursuit of new political hopes and material desires. In Dignifying Argentina, Eduardo Elena considers this transformative moment from a fresh perspective by exploring the intersection of populism and mass consumption. He argues that Peronist actors redefined national citizenship around expansive promises of a vida digna (dignified life), which encompassed not only the satisfaction of basic wants, but also the integration of working Argentines into a modern consumer society.

Winner of the 2013 Book Prize in the Social Sciences awarded by the Southern Cone Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association.
Empire and AntislaveryChristopher Schmidt-NowaraIn 1872, there were more than 300,000 slaves in Cuba and Puerto Rico. Though the Spanish government had passed a law for gradual abolition in 1870, slaveowners, particularly in Cuba, clung tenaciously to their slaves as unfree labor was at the core of the colonial economies. Nonetheless, people throughout the Spanish empire fought to abolish slavery, including the Antillean and Spanish liberals and republicans who founded the Spanish Abolitionist Society in 1865. This book is an extensive study of the origins of the Abolitionist Society and its role in the destruction of Cuban and Puerto Rican slavery and the reshaping of colonial politics.

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End of the PeasantryAnthony PereiraThe rural labor movement played a surprisingly active role in Brazil’s transition to democracy in the 1980s. While in most Latin American countries rural labor was conspicuously marginal, in Brazil, an expanded, secularized, and centralized movement organized strikes, staged demonstrations for land reform, demanded political liberalization, and criticized the government’s environmental policies.

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Expulsion of Mexico's Spaniards, 1821-1836Harold SimsThe definitive account of the expulsion laws passed in 1827-1829 and 1833-34 and the chaos they caused in the new Mexican republic.

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Gaitán of ColombiaRichard SharplessThis book provides a detailed account of the political career of Jorge Eliécer Gaitán, the populist leader of Colombia during the 1930s and 1940s.

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Gender, State, and Medicine in Highland EcuadorA. Kim ClarkKim Clark relates the stories of women who successfully challenged Ecuadorian state programs in the wake of the Liberal Revolution of 1895. New laws left loopholes wherein women could contest entry into education systems, certain professions, and vote in elections. These women became modernizers and agents of change, winning freedoms for themselves and future generations.
Highland Indians and the State in Modern EcuadorA. Kim ClarkThis volume chronicles the changing forms of indigenous engagement with the Ecuadorian state since the early nineteenth century that grew into the strongest unified indigenous movement in Latin America. Nine case studies examine how indigenous peoples have attempted to claim control over state formation in order to improve their position in society. It concludes with four comparative essays that place indigenous organizational strategies in Ecuador within a larger Latin American historical context.

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Honorable LivesVictor Uribe-UranThis is the first work in English to discuss the social and political history of lawyers in a Latin American country. By exploring the lives of lawyers, Uribe-Uran is also able to focus on a general history of Latin America, while exploring key social and political changes and continuities from 1780 to 1850.

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Illusions of ConflictJoseph SmithThe first comprehensive treatment of Anglo-American political and economic rivalry over Latin America from the Civil War until 1895.

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Intervention, Revolution, and Politics in Cuba, 1913-1921Louis Perez Jr.Perez views the various economic, political and diplomatic methods used by the United States government to exert hegemony over Cuba from 1913-1921. He also examines the political turmoil and collapse of the traditional Cuban party structure, as candidates were forced to forge alliances with the U.S.

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Landscapes of StruggleAldo Lauria-SantiagoAn interdisciplinary assessment of El Salvador’s history, politics, and culture from the late nineteenth century through the present.

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Lords of the MountainLouis Pérez Jr.From the 1870s, the sugar industry began to swallow up rural communities and destroy the traditional land tenure system in Cuba, as great sugar estates—the “latifundia,” dominated the economy. Perez chronicles the resistance to these powerful landholders, and the violence propagated against them.

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Meaning of FreedomFrank McGlynnIn The Meaning of Freedom scholars from a wide variety of disciplines contemplate the aftermath of slavery, focusing on Caribbean societies and the southern United States. They attempt to answer the questions about culture, economics, and politics central to this issue.

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Medicine and Politics in Colonial PeruAdam WarrenAn original study examining the primacy placed on physicians and medical care to generate population growth and increase the workforce during the late eigteenth century in colonial Peru.

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Mexican RepublicStanley GreenA colorful acccount of the first decade of Mexican independence from Spain., it views the failed attempt to establish a strong republic, the subsequent civil war that plagued the young nation, and the emergence of two polarized political parties.

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Myths of Harmony Marixa LassoMyths of Harmony examines a foundational moment for Latin American racial constructs. While most contemporary scholarship has focused the explanation for racial tolerance in the colonial period, Marixa Lasso argues that the origins of modern race relations are to be found later, in the Age of Revolution. Lasso's work brings much-needed attention to the important role of the anticolonial struggles in shaping the nature of contemporary race relations and racial identities in Latin America.

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Origins of the Peruvian Labor Movement, 1883–1919Peter BlanchardThe first English language account of early labor movements in Peru. Blanchard's analysis and insights into the economic factors underlying Peru's labor unrest also extends to labor developments and the modernization process throughout Latin America.

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Overthrow of Allende and the Politics of Chile, 1964-1976Paul SigmundAn exhaustive, balanced analysis of the overthrow of Salvador Allende, and why it occurred. Paul e. Sigmund examines the Allende government, the Frei government that preceeded it, the coup that ended it, and the Pinochet government that succeeded it. He also views the roles of various Chilean political and interest groups, the CIA, and U.S. corporations.

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Panajachel Robert HinshawBuilding on Sol Tax's pioneering work of the economic organization of Panajachel in the 1930s, Hinshaw describes this village and analyzes the differences among Indians in other villages responding to environmental and economic changes over the past quarter century. This book offers a unique examination of belief patterns and social relations, and the continuity and change in the society's worldview.

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Piety, Power, and PoliticsDouglass Sullivan-GonzalezDouglass Sullivan-González examines the influence of religion on the development of nationalism in Guatemala during the period 1821–1871, focusing on the relationship between Rafael Carrera and the Guatemalan Catholic Church. He illustrates the peculiar and fascinating blend of religious fervor, popular power, and caudillo politics that inspired a multi-ethnic and multiclass alliance to defend the Guatemalan nation in the mid-nineteenth century.

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Political Culture in Nineteenth-Century PeruUlrich MueckeTracing the development of Peru’s first modern political party, the Partido Civil, Ulrich Muecke touches on virtually every aspect of 19th-century society in that country in this illuminating work.

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Politics of Motherhood Jadwiga Pieper MooneyExamines the negotiations over women's rights and the politics of gender in Chile throughout the twentieth century. Centering her study on motherhood, Pieper Mooney explores dramatic changes in health policy, population paradigms, and understandings of human rights, and reveals that motherhood is hardly a private matter defined only by individual women or couples. Instead, it is intimately tied to public policies and political competitions on nation-state and international levels.

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Practice of Politics in Postcolonial BrazilRoger KittlesonThe Practice of Politics in Postcolonial Brazil traces the history of high and low politics in nineteenth-centiry Brazil from the vantage point of the provincial capitol of Porto Alegre. Kittleson investigates the ways in which lower classes in this area manipulated emerging ideologies to secure limited political inclusion that was unavailable elsewhere.

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Puerto Rico and the United States, 1917-1933Truman ClarkFrom 1917 to 1933, the United States kept Puerto Rico in limbo, offering it neither a course toward independence nor much hope for prompt statehood. Clark unfolds with clarity the painful truth of the United States' unsavory attempt at being both a democratic and imperial nation during this period.

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Rebirth of the Paraguayan RepublicHarris Gaylord WarrenA scholarly study of Paraguay in the decades dominated by the Colorados, immediately following the Allied occupation of the country after the disastrous War of the Triple Alliance, when half of Paraguay's population died.

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Revolutionary Change in CubaCarmelo Mesa-Lago Cuba remains an enigma to most of the world. This collection of essays is a comprehensive and authoritative study of nearly all aspects of socialist Cuba-politics, economics, and society-recorded during the tumultuous period from 1959 to 1970.

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Salt and the Colombian StateJoshua RosenthalIn republican Colombia, salt became an important source of revenue not just to individuals, but to the state, which levied taxes on it and in some cases controlled and profited from its production. Focusing his study on the town of La Salina, Joshua M. Rosenthal presents a fascinating glimpse into the workings of the early Colombian state, its institutions, and their interactions with local citizens during this formative period.
Secret DialoguesKenneth SerbinKenneth Serbin uncovers the existence of secret talks between generals and Roman Catholic bishops at the height of Brazil's military dictatorship. It illuminates the complicity of the Catholic Church in the military’s subversive PR campaigns, abductions, and torturings.

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Slave Emancipation in CubaRebecca ScottRebecca J. Scott explores the dynamics of Cuban emancipation, arguing that slavery was not simply abolished by the metropolitan power of Spain or abandoned because of economic contradictions. Instead, she explains, slave emancipation was a prolonged, gradual and conflictive process unfolding through a series of social, legal, and economic transformations.

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Societies after SlaveryRebecca ScottA major reference tool, providing thousands of entries and rich scholarly annotations, this book defines research on postemancipation societies in North America, South America, Latin America, and Africa.

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Time of FreedomCindy ForsterCindy Forster’s insightful work reveals the critical role played by the rural poor in organizing and sustaining Guatemala’s national revolution of 1944-1954.

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To Hell with ParadiseFrank Fonda Taylor"To Hell with Paradise" illustrates the problems of founding a tourist industry for a European or U.S. clientele in a society where the mass of the population is poor, black, and with a historical experience of slavery and colonialism. It combines political and cultural history to reveal how Jamaica transformed itself in the nineteenth century from a pestilence-ridden “white man’s graveyard” to a sun-drenched tourist paradise.

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Transformations and Crisis of Liberalism in Argentina, 1930–1955Jorge NallimJorge Nállim chronicles the decline of liberalism in Argentina during the volatile period between two military coups—the 1930 overthrow of Hipólito Yrigoyen and the deposing of Juan Perón in 1955. Nállim documents a wide range of locations where liberalism was claimed and ultimately marginalized in the pursuit of individual agendas. He demonstrates how liberalism became a vital and complex factor in the metamorphosis of modern history in Argentina and Latin America as well.
Two-Headed HouseholdSarah HamiltonThe Two-Headed Household is an ethnographic account of gender relations and intrahousehold decisionmaking as well as a policy-oriented study of gender and development in the indigenous Andean community of Chanchalo, Ecuador. Sarah Hamilton argues that, contrary to common belief, men and women participate equally in agricultural production and management, in household decisionmaking, and share in the reproductive tasks of child care, food preparation, and other chores.

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Under the Flags of FreedomPeter BlanchardDuring the wars for independence in Spanish South America (1808-1826), thousands of slaves enlisted under the promise of personal freedom and, in some cases, freedom for other family members. Blacks were recruited by opposing sides in these conflicts and their loyalties rested with whomever they believed would emerge victorious. The prospect of freedom was worth risking one's life for, and wars against Spain presented unprecedented opportunities to attain it. Blanchard's study investigates the issue of slavery from the perspectives of Royalists, patriots, and slaves. He examines the wartime political, ideological, and social dynamics that led to slave recruitment, and the subsequent repercussions in the immediate postindependence era. Under the Flags of Freedom sheds new light on the vital contribution of slaves to the wars for Latin American independence.

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Unequal GiantsJoseph SmithIn 1889 the Brazilian empire was overthrown in a military coup. The goodwill and assistance of the United States to the young republic of Brazil helped forge an alliance. But America's apparently irresistible political and economic advances into Brazil were also hampered by disagreements-over naval armaments, reciprocity arrangements, the issue of coffee valorization, and in the 1920s over Brazil's efforts to play an active role in the League of Nations at Geneva. The relationship proved to be unequal, with the United States gaining influence in Latin America, as the Brazilian elite's ambitions and vanities were fed.

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Vigorous Core of Our NationalityStanley BlakeExplores conceptualizations of regional identity and a distinct population group known as nordestinos in northeastern Brazil during a crucial historical period. Beginning with the abolition of slavery and ending with the demise of the Estado Novo under Getúlio Vargas, Stanley E. Blake offers original perspectives on the paradoxical concept of the nordestino and the importance of these debates to the process of state and nation building.
Xuxub Must DiePaul SullivanMayan rebels killed an American plantation manager in 1875, but no one has ever unravelled why this murder took place. Paul Sullivan’s fascinating and skillful telling of this story reads like a mystery novel.

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