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By Subject - Landscape Studies
TitleAuthorDescription
Between Garden and CityDorothée ImbertThe first biography and study of the work of Belgian landscape architect Jean Canneel-Claes, a significant but somewhat overlooked figure in the history of European modernism. In tracing his contributions, Imbert restores Canneel as a major figure in the development of landscape architecture into a modern discipline.
Pennsylvania FarmingSally McMurryPennsylvania Farming presents the first history of Pennsylvania agriculture in more than sixty years. Sally McMurry goes beyond a strictly economic approach and considers the diverse forces that helped shape the farming landscape, from physical factors to cultural repertoires to labor systems. Above all, the people who created and worked on Pennsylvania’s farms are placed at the center of attention. More than 150 photographs inform the interpretation, which offers a sweeping look at the evolution of Pennsylvania’s agricultural landscapes right up to the present day.
Sites UnseenDianne HarrisSites Unseen challenges conventions for viewing and interpreting the landscape, using visual theory to move beyond traditional practices of describing and classifying objects to explore notions of audience and context. Treats landscape as a spatial, psychological, and sensory encounter, opening a new dialogue for discussing the landscape outside the boundaries of current art criticism and theory.

Winner of the 2009 Allen Noble Book Award from the Pioneer America Society

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Washed with SunJeremy FosterLooking mainly at the years following the British victory in the second Boer War, from 1902 to 1930, Foster examines the influence of painting, writing, architecture, and photography on the construction of a shared, romanticized landscape subjectivity that was perceived as inseparable from “being South African”, and thus helped forge the imagined community of white South Africa.

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