Browse | News & Events | Ordering | UPP Blog | For Authors | For Instructors | Prizes | Rights & Permissions | Hebrew Union College Press | About the Press | Support the Press | Contact Us
November 2011
312 pages  

6 x 9
9780822944904
Hardcover $45.00 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
Vision, Science and Literature, 1870-1920
Ocular Horizons
Willis, Martin
Winner of the British Society for Literature and Science Annual Prize, 2011
Winner of the Cultural Studies in English Prize, 2012

This book explores the role of vision and the culture of observation in Victorian and modernist ways of seeing. Willis charts the characterization of vision through four organizing principles—small, large, past and future—to survey Victorian conceptions of what vision was. He then explores how this Victorian vision influenced twentieth-century ways of seeing, when anxieties over visual "truth" became entwined with modernist rejections of objectivity.

Kindle eBook Available

Nook eBook Available
"Provides a fresh account of modern visualities in the overlap between scientific and literary cultures ... the book abounds with incisive readings and innovative conjunctions." —Victorian Studies

"A highly original work and a landmark study whose impact is likely to be long lasting." —European Society for the Study of English

"The history and philosophy of science merge seamlessly with literary studies in this intelligently crafted study of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century vision. By comparing literary and scientific narratives of visual technologies, Willis uncovers cultural assumptions about the way knowledge works. He stands out as an interdisciplinary scholar who analyzes literature as a source as well as a recipient of learning." —Laura Otis, Emory University

"In explaining the role played by literary narratives in the history of science, and specifically in the visual culture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Willis shows both scientists and novelists at their most human, both driven by wonder and rigor, method and imagination." —Review 19

"The interdisciplinary study of science and science fiction would do well to pursue the combination of archival research with engagement in current debates on the history of scientific culture that Willis exemplifies." —Science Fiction Studies

Complete Description Reviews
Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century
History of Science
close 

Winner of the British Society for Literature and Science Annual Prize, 2011
Winner of the Cultural Studies in English Prize, 2012

This book explores the role of vision and the culture of observation in Victorian and modernist ways of seeing. Willis charts the characterization of vision through four organizing principles—small, large, past and future—to survey Victorian conceptions of what vision was. He then explores how this Victorian vision influenced twentieth-century ways of seeing, when anxieties over visual "truth" became entwined with modernist rejections of objectivity.

close 
close 


close 

© 2017 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.