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February 2014
272 pages  

6 x 9
9780822944997
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The Age of Scientific Naturalism
Tyndall and His Contemporaries
Lightman, Bernard, Reidy, Michael
Physicist John Tyndall and his contemporaries were at the forefront of developing the cosmology of scientific naturalism during the Victorian period. They rejected all but physical laws as having any impact on the operations of human life and the universe. Contributors focus on the way Tyndall and his correspondents developed their ideas through letters, periodicals and scientific journals and challenge previously held assumptions about who gained authority, and how they attained and defended their position within the scientific community.

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Bernard Lightman is professor of humanities at York University and current vice president and president-elect (2018–2019) of the History of Science Society. Among his most recent publications are the edited collections Global Spencerism and A Companion to the History of Science. Lightman is also a general coeditor of The Correspondence of John Tyndall.
Michael S. Reidy is professor of history at Montana State University.
"An important and timely volume, providing significant insight into the conflicts and agreements within nineteenth-century science. All the chapters make useful contributions, while two or three should become staples on future reading lists."—Journal of Historical Geography

"This rich collection of essays concentrates on underexplored aspects of the development of scientific naturalism in the nineteenth century . . . an excellent book, and one can confidently expect that the arguments played out in this volume will continue to be replayed in changing social, political and religious settings." —British Journal for the History of Science

"Adds significantly to the ways in which Tyndall's life and work can be viewed within the history of science." —The Dispersal of Darwin

"Catalyzed by the transcription labor of some 6,000 letters to and from Tyndall, the scholars involved are building a richer sense of an eloquent, assertive individual important to the Victorian scientific elite, and one whose ability to provoke debate over matters of authority and faith gave him a place in the wider culture as well." —Metascience

"Provides a striking view of various scientific naturalists and their interactions with opponents." —Endeavour

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Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century
History of Science
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Physicist John Tyndall and his contemporaries were at the forefront of developing the cosmology of scientific naturalism during the Victorian period. They rejected all but physical laws as having any impact on the operations of human life and the universe. Contributors focus on the way Tyndall and his correspondents developed their ideas through letters, periodicals and scientific journals and challenge previously held assumptions about who gained authority, and how they attained and defended their position within the scientific community.
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