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February 2016
432 pages  

6 x 9
9780822944478
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Cuban Studies 44
de la Fuente, Alejandro
Cuban Studies 44 features articles on recent economic issues in Cuba, public health policies, José Martí's death as a myth of the Cuban nation-buliding project, among other topics.
Alejandro de la Fuente is the Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics and professor of African and African American studies at Harvard University and director of the Afro-Latin American Research Institute in the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research. He is the author of Havana and the Atlantic in the Sixteenth Century and A Nation for All: Race, Inequality, and Politics in Twentieth-Century Cuba, and is the editor of Queloides: Race and Racism in Cuban Contemporary Art.
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Cuban Studies Table of Contents
Latin America/Cultural Studies
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Cuban Studies is the preeminent journal for scholarly work on Cuba. Each volume includes articles in English and Spanish and a large book review section. Cuban Studies 44 features a dossier on the Cuban economy that covers economic problems and causation since 2010 and their possible remedy; tax reform from 2010 to 2014; the reconfiguration of social and economic actors since 2011 and the prospects of a market economy; the functioning of state-owned companies within current restructuring policies; and changes in Cuba’s trade deficit since 2009. Other topics include the consequences of the “Special Period” and the de/reconstruction of the “New Socialist Man”; public health care policies in the post-Soviet era; the Wallace Stevens poem “Academic Discourse at Havana”; U.S. General Fitzhugh Lee’s role in Cuban independence; José Martí’s death as a myth of the Cuban nation-building project; “Operation Pedro Pan” and the framing of childhood memories in the Cuban American community; and the social and political control of nonconformists in 1960s Cuba.
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