browsenews and eventsordering informationfor authorsprizesfor instructorsrights and permissionsdigital editionsEBooksAuthor Videoabout the pressSupport the Presscontact us
February 2013
456 pages  
34 b&w illustrations
6 x 9 1/4
9780822961925
Paper $35.00 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
Visions of Annihilation
The Ustasha Regime and the Cultural Politics of Fascism, 1941–1945
Yeomans, Rory
The Ustasha regime and its militias carried out a ruthless campaign of ethnic cleansing that killed an estimated half million Serbs, Jews, and Gypsies, and ended only with the defeat of the Axis powers in World War II. Yeomans analyzes the Ustasha movement’s use of culture to appeal to radical nationalist sentiments and legitimize its genocidal policies. He shows how the movement attempted to mobilize poets, novelists, filmmakers, visual artists, and intellectuals as purveyors of propaganda and visionaries of a utopian society. Yeomans chronicles the foundations of the movement, its key actors and ideologies, and reveals the unique conditions present in interwar Croatia that led to the rise of fascism.
Rory Yeomans is a senior international research analyst at the International Directorate of the UK Ministry of Justice.
Complete Description Reviews
Pitt Series in Russian and East European Studies Table of Contents
Russia and East Europe/History Read a selection from this book
close 

The fascist Ustasha regime and its militias carried out a ruthless campaign of ethnic cleansing that killed an estimated half million Serbs, Jews, and Gypsies, and ended only with the defeat of the Axis powers in World War II. In Visions of Annihilation, Rory Yeomans analyzes the Ustasha movement’s use of culture to appeal to radical nationalist sentiments and legitimize its genocidal policies. He shows how the movement attempted to mobilize poets, novelists, filmmakers, visual artists, and intellectuals as purveyors of propaganda and visionaries of a utopian society. Meanwhile, newspapers, radio, and speeches called for the expulsion, persecution, or elimination of “alien” and “enemy” populations to purify the nation. He describes how the dual concepts of annihilation and national regeneration were disseminated to the wider population and how they were interpreted at the grassroots level. Yeomans examines the Ustasha movement in the context of other fascist movements in Europe. He cites their similar appeals to idealistic youth, the economically disenfranchised, racial purists, social radicals, and Catholic clericalists. Yeomans further demonstrates how fascism created rituals and practices that mimicked traditional religious faiths and celebrated martyrdom. Visions of Annihilation chronicles the foundations of the Ustasha movement, its key actors and ideologies, and reveals the unique cultural, historical, and political conditions present in interwar Croatia that led to the rise of fascism and contributed to the cataclysmic events that tore across the continent.
close 
close 

“Challenging standard interpretations of fascism while probing previously ignored aspects of the Ustasha regime, this provocative analysis of the politics of cultural and ethnic homogeneity in the Independent State of Croatia (1941–1945) will become one of the most discussed academic books for many years to come and an essential reading for scholars and students of the Holocaust.”—Marius Turda, Oxford Brookes University

“Impressive and innovative . . . an important and challenging addition both to the literature of the civil war in Yugoslavia and to that of eastern European fascism.”—H-Soz-u-Kult

“This work makes an important contribution to the cultural history of Croatian fascism during WWII. Yeomans provides a highly detailed analysis of the Ustasha movement's efforts to create a new facist culture within the newly constituted Ustasha state. . . . He illustrates well the tensions that arose from this radical project of annihilation and national regeneration, and locates it within the wider parameters of European fascism.”—Choice


close 

© 2014 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.