Browse | News & Events | Ordering | UPP Blog | For Authors | For Instructors | Prizes | Rights & Permissions | Hebrew Union College Press | About the Press | Support the Press | Contact Us
February 1988
208 pages  

6 x 9
9780822985709
Paper $25.95 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
Primary Medical Care in Chile
Accessibility under Military Rule
Scarpaci, Joseph
Scarpaci views the financial and cultural impediments imposed by the Pinochet HMO medical system that compromised and effectively limited health care accessibility for much of Chile's adult population.

View the Digital Edition
Joseph L. Scarpaci is professor emeritus of geography at Virginia Tech University, and author of Primary Medical Care in Chile: Accessibility under Military Rule.
“Scarpaci has produced a well-written, informative and often provocative account of Chile's formal system of primary medical services. . . . an important contribution to the growing body of literature on health care systems. . . . It will be of particular interest to medical geographers, students of international health care policy and systems, and Latin American and urban specialists.”—Annals of the Association of American Geographers

“Provides an excellent analysis of the reforms undertaken by the Pinochet administration. It also contains extensive data on all the essential aspects of medical care as well as a forceful critique of the nature and impact of these policies.”—Latin American Research Review

Complete Description Reviews
Pitt Latin American Series
Latin America/Politics
close 

Since Pinochet's regime assumed power in 1973, the Chilean public medical system has been incrementally disassembled in favor of private enterprise, modeled after U.S. HMOs. Scarpaci assembles data ranging from interviews with patients to income statements and balance sheets from the National Health Service System, National Health Fund, and National Statistics Institute to view the financial and cultural impediments imposed by the Pinochet system that have compromised and effectively limited health care accessibility for Chile's adult population.
close 
close 


close 

© 2017 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.