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April 1986
278 pages  

6 x 9
9780822985655
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Voices, Visions, and a New Reality
Mexican Fiction Since 1970
Duncan, J. Ann
This book introduces to a larger audience the work of a group of Mexican writers whose work reflects the stimulus of the “boom” of the 1960s, especially in the experimental nueva novella. Duncan views the work of six writers in the context of more well known writers of the period (Ruflo, Fuentes, and Del Paso), and concludes with a chapter on other recent innovators in Mexican literature.

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J. Ann Duncan (1940-1989) was fellow and director of studies at Newnham College, Cambridge.
“J. Ann Duncan has written a lucid, informative and distinctive work, whose scope is captured effectively in the title. Within the very rich field of Mexican 'post-boom' narrative, she focuses on those writers whose prose, as the title intimates, is innovative and experimental, whose work 'widens our definition of literature.' The writers to whom chapters are dedicated are José Emilio Pacheco (1939), Carlos Montemayer (1947), Humberto Guzmán (1948), Esther Seligson (1942), Antonio Delgado (1941), and Jesús Gardea (1939).”—Reseñas

“Dr. Duncan's analyses are perceptive and, in the chapters on Guzmán and Delgado, exceedingly well wrought; scholars with an interest in contemporary Mexican writing will be indebted to her for charting territory that is as vast as it is relatively unknown.”—Modern Language Review

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Pitt Latin American Series
Latin America/Literature
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This book introduces to a larger audience the work of a group of Mexican writers whose work reflects the stimulus of the “boom” of the 1960s, especially in the experimental nueva novella. Duncan views the work of six writers in the context of more well known writers of the period (Ruflo, Fuentes, and Del Paso), and concludes with a chapter on other recent innovators in Mexican literature. Despite their diversity, these texts share many common features, and unlike social realism, the works are not openly political, but at the same time they question assumptions about reality itself-and the relation of fiction to truth.
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