Browse | News & Events | Ordering | UPP Blog | For Authors | For Instructors | Prizes | Rights & Permissions | Hebrew Union College Press | About the Press | Support the Press | Contact Us
July 1988
214 pages  

6 x 9
9780822985723
Paper $25.95 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
Restructuring Domination
Industrialists and the State in Ecuador
Conaghan, Catherine
Using Ecuador as her case study, she shows how industrial growth has given birth to an exclusive, ingrown bourgeoisie that is highly dependent on the state and foreign capital and is increasingly alienated from the peasants and urban poor.

View the Digital Edition
Catherine M. Conaghan is professor of political science at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario.
“What conditions contribute to the success or failure of reformist policies in Latin America is a question which structures Catherine Conaghan's analysis of politics during the 1970s and early 1980s in Ecuador. . . . This fine book is important reading for anyone seriously interested in Ecuadorian politics, or in the broader questions of reformist politics in Latin America.”—Hispanic American Historical Review

“Conaghan has produced a work of modest length that nonetheless addresses important intellectual issues.”—American Political Science Review

“Ecuadorian General Guillermo Rodrígues Lara (1972-1976) was not the ordinary Latin American military ruler. Seeking reform not repression, he won the unflagging support of the Communist Party, if the undying enmity of the wealthy. Catherine M. Conaghan successfully explores this intriguing topic, drawing especially from interviews with leaders in industry, banking, government, and political parties. . . . a most significant contribution.”—The Americas

Complete Description Reviews
Pitt Latin American Series
Latin America/Politics
close 

The industrial development of Ecuador has made fortunes for some, but has largely bypassed the general population. Armed by its new power, the bourgeoisie has captured sate mechanisms for its own advancement, leading to the paradox of a “democratic authoritarianism.” In this study, Catherine M. Conaghan views the crucial differences between the social and economic changes in newly developed Latin American nations and those of the southern cone. Using Ecuador as her case study, she shows how industrial growth has given birth to an exclusive, ingrown bourgeoisie that is highly dependent on the state and foreign capital and is increasingly alienated from the peasants and urban poor.
close 
close 


close 

© 2017 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.