browsenews and eventsordering informationfor authorsprizesfor instructorsrights and permissionsdigital editionsEBooksAuthor Videoabout the pressSupport the Presscontact us
October 1971
278 pages  

6 x 9
9780822984344
Paper $25.95 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
The American Ideology of National Science, 1919-1930
Tobey, Ronald
A provocative analysis of the movement to establish a national science program in the early twentieth century. Led by several influential scientists who had participated in centralized scientific enterprises during World War I, the new effort t was an attempt to return to earlier progressive values in the hope of producing science for society's benefit.

View the Digital Edition
Ronald C. Tobey is professor of history at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of Saving the Prairies: The Life Cycle of the Founding School of American Plant Ecology, 1895-1955.
Complete Description Reviews
Philosophy of Science
close 

Ronald C. Tobey provides a provocative analysis of the movement to establish a national science program in the early twentieth century. Led by several influential scientists, who had participated in centralized scientific enterprises during World War I, the new effort to conjoin science and society was an attempt to return to earlier progressive values with the hope of producing science for society's benefit. The movement was initially undermined by the new physics, and Einstein's theories of relativity, which shattered traditional views and alienated the American public. Nationalized research programs were tempered by the conservatism of corporate donors. Later, with the disintegration of progressivism, the gap between science and society made it impossible for the two cultures to unite.
close 
close 


close 

© 2014 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.