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February 2004
400 pages  

6 x 9
9780822958208
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Science at Century’s End
Philosophical Questions on the Progress and Limits of Science
Carrier, Martin, Massey, Gerald, Ruetsche, Laura
Twenty penetrating essays by prominent philosophers and historians who explore and debate the limits of scientific inquiry and their presumed consequences for science in the 21st century.

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Martin Carrier, professor of philiosophy at the University of Heidelberg, received his Ph.D. from the University of Munster in 1984 for work on the history of chemistry.
Laura Ruetsche joined the Philosophy Department of the University of Pittsburgh in 1996, and has been an associate director of Pittsburgh's Center for Philosophy of Science since 1997. Her primary research interest is the philosophy of physics, particularly the interpretation of quantum theories.
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The Pittsburgh-Konstanz Series in the Philosophy and History of Science
Philosophy of Science
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To most laypersons and scientists, science and progress appear to go hand in hand, yet philosophers and historians of science have long questioned the inevitability of this pairing. As we take leave of a century acclaimed for scientific advances and progress, Science at Century's End, the eighth volume of the Pittsburgh-Konstanz Series in the Philosophy and History of Science, takes the reader to the heart of this important matter. Subtitled Philosophical Questions on the Progress and Limits of Science, this timely volume contains twenty penetrating essays by prominent philosophers and historians who explore and debate the limits of scientific inquiry and their presumed consequences for science in the 21st century.
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“The exemplars from 18th-century chemistry, 19th-century electromagnetic theory, and contemporary particle physics, biology, and quantum theory well illustrate the classical struggles of realism, induction, explanation, and prediction that occupy current considerations of modern scientific change. . . . This volume well represents a fertile spectrum of issues of urgency to both introductory and veteran participants. Highly recommended.”—Choice, Dec. 2000


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