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December 1998
260 pages  

6 x 9
9780822956792
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Rewriting Capitalism
Literature and the Market in Late Tsarist Russia and the Kingdom of Poland
Holmgren, Beth
Holmgren examines how capitalism in turn-of-the-century Russia and the Kingdom of Poland affected the elitist culture of literature, publishing, book markets, and readership.

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Beth Holmgren is professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at Duke University. She is the author of Woman's Works in Stalin's Time: On Lidiia Chukoskaia and Nadezhda Mandelstam.
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Pitt Series in Russian and East European Studies
Russia and East Europe/Literature
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Holmgren examines how capitalism in turn-of-the-century Russia and the Kingdom of Poland affected the elitist culture of literature, publishing, book markets, and readership. Holmgren also draws parallels with and assesses recent literary and publishing developments in Russia and Poland, shedding light on the current book market and the literature of Eastern Europe as a whole. In this ground-breaking book, Beth Holmgren examines how—in turn-of-the-century Russia and its subject, the Kingdom of Poland—capitalism affected the elitist culture of literature, publishing, book markets, and readership. Rewriting Capitalism considers how both “serious” writers and producers of consumer culture coped with the drastic power shift from “serious” literature to market-driven literature.
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“Rigorously argued and wonderfully written, this book compares the emerging ideas of a literary market in Russia and Poland. The material is well chosen, the analysis convincing and insightful. A wide range of readers, including Slavists and students of culture . . . will learn from its intellectual high spirits and very smart ideas.”—Stephanie Sandler, Amherst College

“The book combines sophisticated scholarship with solid research and an elegant conversational style that smoothly embraces the most difficult analytical concepts.” —Bozena Shallcross, Indiana University

“Nothing like this book exists right now, and I cannot imagine who in Slavic [studies] would have the command of both Russian and Polish sources, as well as the necessary knowledge of the two cultures, to author anything comparable.”—Helena Goscilo, University of Pittsburgh

“What happens to Russian and Polish literature in the contemporary climate of commercialization? . . . Holmgren’s book manages, seemingly effortlessly, to span literary analysis, historical insights, as well as a lively commentary on book production, while not losing sight of the central issue: what happens when a book becomes a product in cultures that revere books and writers.”-- Nadya Peterson, Hunter College (The Polish Review, Vol. XLV, NO. 1, 20000:105-118.)

"In this ambitious examination of the impact of capitalism on Russian and Polish literature at turn-of-the-century, . . . Holmgren has produced a timely, original, insightful and accessible book. . . . A wide range of readers will derive any number of insights from this concise, sophisticated, and engaging work." ––H-Net

“It is good to see a study of the Russian Empire that gives serious treatment to a non-Russian culture.”--Catriona Kelly, Journal of Modern History, 72.4 (December 2000)

“This book has much to offer a wide audience of literary scholars and historians. Holmgren has used her prodigious linguistic skills to write a fascinating study of Russian and Polish literary culture. In the process, she has asked us all to rethink our understanding of what really divides Europe into East and West.”---Christine Ruane, American Historical Review, October 2000

“ ... well-written and engaging. Its comparative method is successful: ... an elegant and thoughtful study that will surely give rise to further research in the years to come.” Stephen Lovell, Seer, 80, 2, 2002


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