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March 2001
264 pages  

6 x 9
9780822954521
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The Competitive City
The Political Economy of Suburbia
Schneider, Mark
The Competitive City analyzes the effect of competition among suburban communities to attract residents and businesses with better public services and lower taxes. This timely book won a special citation from the American Political Science Association's Urban Affairs Section for its "major theoretical development."

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Mark Schneider iis Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Stony Brook University, State University of New York.
“Schneider has written a readable, accessible book that draws on the experience of suburban municipalities to explore, in a statistical analysis, the impact of interlocal competition on local expenditures. His research is a rigorous and sophisticated piece of work that will be‘must’ reading for serious researchers in the field.”—Journal of Federalism

"Schneider's thorough review of the literature on municipal fiscal politics and his empirical testing of many key assertions make this a book scholars in this field should not miss." —Choice

"Schneider's model raises the level of analysis by public choice theorists to a higher level."—Perspectives on Political Science

“Deserves widespread attention among urban scholars.”—American Political Science Review

“Schneider draws on rational choice approaches to delineate the concept of a local market for public goods. He builds on Charles Peterson's more recent conceptual refinements to form an elegant empirical model of local government growth.”—Journal of Politics

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Political Science/US
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This timely and important book, which won a special citation from the American Political Science Association’s Urban Affairs Section for its “major theoretical development,” analyzes the effect of competition among suburban communities to attract residents and business with the best public services and the lowest taxes. Using data from a large sample of suburban cities, Mark Schneider offers a theoretical extension of the Tiebout-Peterson approach to understanding public policies and integrates this perspective with recent work on the power of bureaucrats to control budgets.
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