browsenews and eventsordering informationfor authorsprizesfor instructorsrights and permissionsdigital editionsEBooksAuthor Videoabout the pressSupport the Presscontact us
July 1997
330 pages  

6 x 9
9780822956297
Paper $25.95 Add to cart

View Cart
Check Out
Other Ways to order
Between the Branches
The White House Office of Legislative Affairs
Collier, Kenneth
Because of the power-fearing drafters of the U.S. Constitution, presidents have had to look beyond the formal powers of the office to influence Congress and push a legislative agenda. In Between the Branches, a book of unprecedented depth, Kenneth Collier traces the evolution of the methods the White House has developed to influence Congress over nine adminstrations, from Eisenhower to Clinton.

View the Digital Edition
Kenneth Collier is assistant professor of political science at the University of Kansas. He is the recipient of grants from the Gerald R. Ford Foundation, Everett Dirksen Center, and the University of Kansas.
Complete Description Reviews
Table of Contents
Political Science/US Read a selection from this book
close 

Because of the power-fearing drafters of the U.S. Constitution, the president’s tools for influencing Congress are quite limited. Presidents have had to look beyond the formal powers of the office to push a legislative agenda. In Between the Branches, a book of unprecedented depth, Kenneth Collier traces the evolution of White House influence in Congress over nine adminstrations, from Eisenhower to Clinton. It will enlighten students of the presidency, Congress, and all those interested in American politics.
close 
close 

“Collier brings a firm grasp of the existing literature, first-hand examination of documents in presidential libraries, and elite interviews collected from both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue. The product is a thoroughly documented account of how presidents seek to influence Congress as well as how Congress registers reciprocal effects on the president.”—Joseph A. Pika

"Weaves archival material with secondary sources to produce an accurate, nuanced, and yet concise history of one aspect of presidential institutional development across a half-century." —Political Science Quarterly

"A useful and welcome balance to other studies that attempt to measure presidential success with Congress." —Journal of Legislative Studies


close 

© 2014 University of Pittsburgh Press. All rights reserved.