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October 1990
368 pages  
28 b&w Illustrations
6 x 9
9780822954385
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Creating America
George Horace Lorimer and The Saturday Evening Post
Cohn, Jan
Before movies, radio, and television challenged the hegemony of the printed word, the Saturday Evening Post was the preeminent vehicle of mass culture in the United States. And to the extent that a mass medium can be the expression of a single individual, this magazine, with a peak circulation of almost three million copies a week, was the expression of its editor, George Horace Lorimer. Cohn shows how Lorimer made the Post into a uniquely powerful magazine that both celebrated and helped form the values of the time.

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Jan Cohn was G. Keith Funston Professor of American Literature and American Studies at Trinity College and the author of four other books, including Creating America (1989).
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Before movies, radio, and television challenged the hegemony of the printed word, the Saturday Evening Post was the preeminent vehicle of mass culture in the United States. And to the extent that a mass medium can be the expression of a single individual, this magazine, with a peak circulation of almost three million copies a week, was the expression of its editor, George Horace Lorimer. Cohn shows how Lorimer made the Post into a uniquely powerful magazine that both celebrated and helped form the values of the time.
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“A fascinating and important contribution to the history of American ideology as mediated through that magazine.”—American Studies

"Essential reading for cultural historians."—Library Journal

"A fascinating and scholary look at a magazine that, for a time, wielded amazing power. . . . [Cohn] moves right along, mixing quotes with commentary in a sprightly, always interesting way." —New York Times Book Review

"If you think 'lively academic writing' is an oxymoron, it may interest you to know that your reviewer devoured this rich slice of Americana in a single sitting." —Peggy Barber, Barron's


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