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February 1998
240 pages  

6 x 9
9780822985815
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Between Nation and State
Serbian Politics in Croatia Before the First World War
Miller, Nicholas
Miller chronicles the politics in Croatia prior to the first World War. The failures of the Croat-Serbian Coalition led to their inability to create a cohesive civic/democratic union during the war years, and prevail to this day.

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Nicholas Miller is professor and chair of the department of history at Boise State University.
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Pitt Series in Russian and East European Studies
Russia and East Europe/Politics
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Nicholas Miller chronicles the politics in Croatia (1903-1914,) prior to the first World War. He examines the failures of the Croat-Serbian Coalition that led to their future inability to create a cohesive civic/democratic union during the war years. The Serb-Croat differences—political, ethnic, and regional—prevail to this day.
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“An important contribution to understanding the perennial Balkan dilemma of a minorty’s position among a majoirty seeking autonomy or independence. . . . Miller’s painstaking detail revises important aspects of the standard work by Ivo Banac. . . . Highly recommended for all academic and larger public libraries.”—Library Journal

“Nick Miller’s book is an overdue study of the rather promising political alliance between Croats and Croatian Serbs at the start of the twentieth century. Its persuasive case should drive a fatal spike into the notion that the subsequent violence between the two groups is the inevitable result of age-old antagonisms.”—John R. Lampe, Woodrow Wilson Center

"Offers a well-drawn picture of minority politics in Croatia." ––H-Net Reviews, September 1998

“. . . a welcome addition to the scholarly literature about South Slavic history and politics. . . especially welcome because it dismisses the still relatively popular idea that the Croat-Serb antagonism is “age-old” or “ancient.” Miller shows that it is in fact quite recent, and that the period before the First World War was one of cooperation rather than confrontation, even though it did end in political failure.”—Canadian Slavonic Papers


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